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Byron Shire
August 18, 2022

Cinema reviews: Destroyer

Latest News

Food, drink and craft brewery ’in principle’ approval for Tweed South Industrial Estate

Industrial estate zoning was under question at Tweed Council's planning meeting on 4 August as councillors endorsed the development application (DA) for an ‘artisan food and drink industry including craft brewery, retail area and restaurant at Industry Drive Tweed Heads South. 

Other News

Veteran big band sounds coming to Ballina

The Royal Australian Navy Veterans Band is coming to Ballina RSL on Thursday, with a concert raising funds for the Northern Rivers Flood Relief Fund, by donation. They will be joined by the Royal Australian Navy Band, from Sydney, for what will be a big sound in a great cause.

Have your say on aged care facility in Kingscliff  

The developers of new $150 million redevelopment ‘designed to meet the growing and evolving needs of seniors in the region’, are inviting Kingscliff residents to take part in community consultation.

Draft COMP caps Public Access at Lismore Council

A Draft Code of Meeting Practice (COMP) and Briefing Policy prepared by the Governance & Customer Service Manager was the subject of discussion at Lismore Council this week.

Police assault charge heads back to local court

The NSW Supreme Court has found that a decision by local magistrate and former police officer, Michael Deakin, was an ‘error of law’.

West Ballina locals concerned about new flood risk

A large group of West Ballina residents are alarmed about a DA which has been submitted to Ballina Shire Council by the Emmanuel Anglican College in Horizon Drive. The proposal, for a STEM and Digital Technology Centre, is planned for a well-known flood-prone area which previously acted as part of a large retention pond.

Olivia Newton-John and FernGully

Olivia Newton-John was active in many environmental issues in the Northern Rivers region. One in particular was the 12-year battle to save ‘Fern Gully’ in Coorabell from being dammed.

Is this really how the LAPD go about their business? A bank robbery is in progress. Six masked gunmen are holding the staff and customers in terror. Three coppers turn up, a couple with automatic rifles, and they storm into the bank firing blindly at anything that moves. It beggars belief that in the US this might be seen as standard operational procedure, but it is sold to us in the movies ad nauseam. This is one of those dark and gritty flicks in which you begin to wonder at the half-way point just how much longer you might be prepared to spend with a collection of so many unpleasant characters – which is to say, everybody is tough and they all swear a lot (but don’t smoke ciggies). Nicole Kidman is Erin Bell, a detective who has ‘lost it’ after a botched undercover job in which she was involved resulted in the death of Chris (Sebastian Stan), a fellow police officer and the father of her child. The hair and makeup people have made her look like the living dead and she carries herself accordingly. Erin has a constantly downcast expression that is accompanied by a low, almost whispering vocal delivery that renders much of her dialogue almost incomprehensible. She has become active again after discovering that Silas (Toby Kebbell), the murderous villain responsible for her fall from grace, is back in town. The story is told with constant flashbacks to when Erin and Chris were infiltrating Silas’s gang, interspersed with her tracking down her nemesis. The sidelight is how, as a mother, she is determined to keep her impressionable sixteen-year-old daughter, Shelby (Jade Pettyjohn), out of Los Angeles’s gangsta underworld. The circular plot – ending with a surprise reveal that had been cleverly concealed throughout – is tight and not too complicated, the score heavy-handed, and the violence customary. It’s absorbing, but not an easy film to like, and I didn’t care in the least what happened to Erin, despite director Karyn Kusama’ mawkish last shots.


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Storylines – The Voice of the voiceless

My grandfather would often tell me a story. A story about a community. This community was self-sufficient, self-reliant, and self-determining of their own lives.

Draft COMP caps Public Access at Lismore Council

A Draft Code of Meeting Practice (COMP) and Briefing Policy prepared by the Governance & Customer Service Manager was the subject of discussion at Lismore Council this week.

Olivia Newton-John and FernGully

Olivia Newton-John was active in many environmental issues in the Northern Rivers region. One in particular was the 12-year battle to save ‘Fern Gully’ in Coorabell from being dammed.

Planning Dept investigates Splendour festival site

The company which owns and manages North Byron Parklands is being investigated by the NSW Department of Planning over traffic safety breaches that occurred during last month’s Splendour in the Grass festival.