22 C
Byron Shire
May 15, 2021

Landmark Tweed Heads lookout closed

Latest News

Bluesfest announces October dates for 2021 festival

After two disappointing cancelations of their event, Bluesfest has announced that they will hold the 2021 festival over the...

Other News

Father and son win first sailing race

Sixteen boats competed in the Tweed Valley Sailing Club’s race day earlier this month in a 10-12 knot breeze...

Editorial: The vulnerable at risk

Most of us would hope that the taxes we pay go towards key areas such as health, education and to supporting the most vulnerable in our community.

Flickerfest tour returns to the Northern Rivers

Celebrating 30 years in 2021 Flickerfest is bringing its National Tour to The Regent Cinema Murwillumbah for one big film packed this weekend

NewsCorp announces August revival of regional news print in QLD

Less than a week after the two major NewsCorp-owned outlets on the Northern Rivers lost their websites and redirected readers via The Daily Telegraph (TDT), sister publications in Queensland announced almost the opposite.

‘Seven and a bit’ stone

Stone & Wood are thrilled to announce the return of Festival of the Stone to their Byron-based Brewery, Saturday...

Echo turns 35 and You are invited!

This year The Echo turns 35, and to celebrate this momentous anniversary they are putting on The Echo Community Awards – and everyone is invited!

 A 1950 postcard showing the view to Razorback from Kirra Hill. St Augustine's Catholic Church is pictured on the left. Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.
A 1950 postcard showing the view to Razorback from Kirra Hill. St Augustine’s Catholic Church is pictured on the left. Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.

The Tweed Heads landmark lookout commonly known as Razorback has been closed to the public due to safety concerns, until further notice.

Tweed Shire Council staff on Friday erected fencing and signage at the bottom of the walkway at the base of the Tom Beatson Lookout to keep people out, but the carpark at the top end of Razorback Road remains open.

Council’s recreation services manager Stewart Brawley said council apologised for any inconvenience to residents and visitors and that alternative lookouts are located at Point Danger, Kirra Hill and Greenmount.

Mr Brawley said the site had ‘great cultural significance to the local Aboriginal community and historical connections for many in the Tweed and southern Gold Coast community’.

For generations of Tweed residents, Razorback has been a special place.

The track up Razorback looking towards the bottom of the hill in 1921. Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum. Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.
The track up Razorback looking towards the bottom of the hill in 1921. Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.
Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.

The bushland around the lookout was restored around two years ago  as part of the Tweed Byron Bush Futures Project

Razorback was a special place for the people of the Tweed long before Europeans came to the area, according to local Aboriginal spokesman Joshua Slabb.

Tweed Heads Historical Society’s Joan Smith said that ‘by the 1920s, Coolangatta and Tweed Heads was becoming a tourist destination; mainly for the pristine beaches where the city people came to recuperate on their doctors’ advice’.

‘During the daytime guests were encouraged to walk and swim at the beach and take short walks to Point Danger and Razorback. A walk to Razorback from town would take at least half a day and kept the guests occupied and out of doors,’ Ms Smith said.

The landmark was not named until 1938 and up until then had been variously known as Toongarabah, Trig Hill and Observation Hill.

Mrs Smith recalls the difficult walk to the summit as a child, and the rocks which gave the landmark its name.

‘The top was very stony and difficult to walk on and it was easy to turn your ankle,’ she said.

‘That was the part referred to as the razor, the old-fashioned cut-throat razor? Many of the early visitors had to get down on their hands and knees to make the climb to the top.’

Bush Futures Project manager John Turnbull said Razorback supports littoral rainforest vegetation, an Endangered Ecological Community in NSW and a Critically Endangered Ecological Community under Commonwealth legislation.

Banana growing on Razorback circa 1890s. The small house in the foreground is approximately where Scotts Market Basket used to be (now a vacant lot opposite the Ivory Hotel). Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum. Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.
Banana growing on Razorback circa 1890s. The small house in the foreground is approximately where Scotts Market Basket used to be (now a vacant lot opposite the Ivory Hotel). Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.
Photo courtesy Tweed River Regional Museum.

‘The vegetation at this site has persisted despite significant weed infestation and interestingly, is one of only two sites in the Tweed that supports littoral rainforest on soil substrates, with the majority of occurrences occurring on coastal sands and hind dunes,’ Mr Turnbull said.

The Lookout is located on Razorback Road, off Charles Street, Tweed Heads.

A fact sheet on the closure is available at www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/ParksAndGardens


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Power outage in Byron Shire

Power supply company Essential Energy says that approximately 1,780 homes and businesses were without supply this morning.

Filming of Byron Baes begins with no indigenous consultation

Filming of the Netflix series Byron Baes has reportedly commenced without any effort made by the show's production company – Eureka Productions – to consult with local indigenous groups or the local Council.

Byron Comedy Festival launched with a laugh

At a hilarious sold-out launch of the Byron Comedy Festival, Dr Karl Kruszelnicki had the entire Byron Bay Surf Club giggling last night

School Strike for Climate next Friday

Next Friday from 10am Byron Shire students will be demanding political action on the climate emergency in what they and their supporters say is our present, future and reality.