20 C
Byron Shire
October 25, 2021

150 koalas spotted at Byron Bay Library

Latest News

#Bigbadbiomass rally at Condong sugar mill

Around 50 people gathered on Friday morning at the big fig tree near the Condong sugar mill to join the world-wide #Bigbadbiomass protest against the use of biomass to create energy and to emphasise that burning biomass is not ‘environmentally friendly’.

Other News

Library restrictions

Under Richmond Tweed Library restrictions announced today, our local libraries are now only offering click and collect, and online...

Can businesses ask for your vax status?

Currently, throughout the business community, we are witnessing uncertainty with respect to business owners asking the question – should...

After a long, arduous and uninformed debate… Saddle Road DA approved

Councillors finally ‘got there in the end’, interim Mayor, Michael Lyon, told an exhausted audience after many hours of confused meandering at last Thursday’s Council meeting.

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Love U 4 EV

In order to transition from a fossil fuel powered car industry I think we need to address our car culture. We’re petrol heads. Mad Max would have been a very different movie if Mel had to find a charging station instead of fuel.

Black bellied whale sighted at Ballina dubbed ‘Liquorice’

For years southern waters whale watchers have been keeping their eyes keen for Migaloo and his offspring, but just...

End of Days

Sometimes life would be a lot simpler if I could just believe in God. If I could believe that...

This lucky koala has a great view of Tyagarah from koala from McAuleys Lane where it was spotted. It's just one of 150 photographs of local koalas in a new exhibition at Byron Bay Library.
This lucky koala has a great view of Tyagarah from McAuleys Lane where it was spotted. It’s just one of 150 photographs of local koalas in a new exhibition at Byron Bay Library.

Byron Shire mayor Simon Richardson will open an exhibition of ‘portraits’ of Byron Bay koalas this morning at Byron Library.

The photographs are the best ones chosen from a selection taken by local residents.

They were collected after a call-out by biologist and Echonetdaily contributor Mary Gardner asking people to send in photos of koalas they had snapped in the Byron area.

More than 150 pictures of koalas in and around Byron Bay were submitted.

‘We know from scientific reports that there are koalas all over Byron and we also knew anecdotally because people kept telling us they see them but we were so delighted to see so many photos come in of so many different koalas,’ says Mary Gardner.

The exhibition contains photos of local koalas found between Broken Head and Myocum and is on display until July inside the Byron Bay Library.

The photographs and are labelled by location and date.

All 150 photos are also being used to create a digital story map about Byron koalas.

‘Byron koalas are neighbours that we can learn to recognise and look out for,’ says Mary Gardner.

People might begin to recognise different koalas — they have very distinctive features.

‘A 2012 Koala Habitat Study for Byron Council reported two major koala population centres were identified; Myocum-Tyagarah and West Byron.

Field data provide a broad population estimate of approximately 240 koalas existing within currently occupied habitat.

Despite a number of myths circulating about how many koalas are in Byron it is evident, given the breadth of locations of the koalas in these photos, that they are indeed here and in significant numbers,’ said Cate Coorey of Byron Residents’ Group.

‘What is frustrating and disappointing is that at the moment there is no plan in place to protect them.

‘Until the council votes to adopt the Draft Byron Coastal Koala Plan of Management our koalas are subject to factors that deplete their numbers – most of them from human activity,’ Ms Coorey added.

Ms Gardner said, ‘our koalas are experiencing tough times – shortage of home trees and food trees, dog attacks, infectious diseases and lack of planning for their future security.

‘Their trees are not well protected and there aren’t Byron Bay wide plans for growing more.

‘Traffic is cutting apart their corridors and secure places in the Belongil and Tallows catchments which make up Bryon Bay,’ Ms Gardner added.

The display has been compiled by the Byron Belongil Environment Group, an affinity group of the Byron Residents Group, and supported by Koala Connections project of the Byron Shire Council.

For further information or to provide more photographs contact Mary Gardner at [email protected] or 0423 742 792


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Can businesses ask for your vax status?

Currently, throughout the business community, we are witnessing uncertainty with respect to business owners asking the question – should we ask customers about their...

Tracking the hardening coast

Researchers are watching our shorelines get harder and simpler.

Recycling polystyrene just got easier at Lismore’s Recycling & Recovery Centre

The Lismore Recycling & Recovery Centre has a new machine that can recycle polystyrene which will help the facility increase the capacity to deal with this earth-wrecking synthetic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-polymer.

4WDs multiplying on Seven Mile Beach?

Beach users in Lennox Head are reporting much higher numbers of 4WDs on Seven Mile Beach recently, along with an increase in hooning behaviour. Since...