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December 2, 2022

Eco-shark barriers do offer protection

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1hDGndPgJg

Following the attacks on surfers in Ballina, and again in Byron this week, I am once more submitting the video interview I did with Craig Moss, the developer of the Eco-Shark barrier.

A lot of people, including myself, had heard of the Eco-shark barrier, and its successful trial last year in Cottesloe, in WA.

But Cottesloe is not a surf beach, and I did not know whether or not a barrier like this could be installed in a high surf area.

But as Craig Moss discusses in the interview, the barrier according to him, would be very suitable and resilient in almost any surf beach.

I really hope that surfers rally together to have these barriers installed at beaches throughout Australia and the world.

The cost factor is the only reason why we shouldn’t all be able to enjoy our surfing lifestyle, in safety.

The surfing industry worldwide is a billion dollar industry that can generate income from many sectors, to fund these barriers.

Mark Abriel, Byron Bay


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