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Tiny homes making a big impression

The Sustainable House Day Collaboration – from left: Kim Mallee - Byron Shire Council, Paula Newman - Lismore City Council, Cindy Picton - Dorroughby Environment Educational Centre, Karrie Bowtell - North Coast TAFE, Debbie Firestone - Tweed Shire Council, Alice Moffett - Self Seed Sustainability and Sandi Middleton – Sandi Middleton Consulting.

The Sustainable House Day Collaboration – from left: Kim Mallee – Byron Shire Council, Paula Newman – Lismore City Council, Cindy Picton – Dorroughby Environment Educational Centre, Karrie Bowtell – North Coast TAFE, Debbie Firestone – Tweed Shire Council, Alice Moffett – Self Seed Sustainability and Sandi Middleton – Sandi Middleton Consulting.

For something so tiny, it’s gathering a huge following.

That’s how Sandi Middleton, event coordinator from The Sustainable House Day Northern Rivers Collaboration, sees the future of tiny homes as they become more mainstream in our urban and rural landscape.

‘Tiny homes and living sustainably are being discussed at dinner tables around Australia as we grapple with how to live with a lighter footprint at an affordable price.

‘And it all starts with a good concept or plan of how a tiny house looks and functions.

‘Here in the Northern Rivers, the Sustainable House Day Expo is the perfect event for designers to showcase their creativity and this year we have added a new ‘speed date a designer’ session,’ she enthused.

Ray Maher, co-director of Project Habitation and a judge for the design competition, said the expo’s ‘speed dating’ session is a great opportunity for people thinking of building to chat with a designer and get professional advice for free.

‘If it helps people find sustainable design professionals they connect with, then it’s good for the community, good for designers and good for the planet,’ he said.

If you have a great idea for a tiny home, you have four weeks to get your entry in. Last day for entries is 1 September.

Enter your design and go into the running for $5,000 in cash and prizes.

The competition is open to residents, architects, designers and young people in the Northern Rivers.

The three categories for design are: Tiny Homes – A Pocket Neighbourhood; A Tiny Home; and A Teeny Tiny Home.

To find out more or to enter go to www.sustainablehousedaynr.org.

In previous years the competition has seen up to 80 entries were enjoyed by around 1,500 viewers.

The 2016 Design Competition will culminate in a Showcase Awards and Expo at Mullumbimby Civic Hall on Saturday 17 September.

Residents will be able to view the entries, meet the designers and vote for their favourite design.

People wanting a stall at the Sustainable House Day Expo are encouraged to phone Ms Middleton soon, as stallholder applications close on August 9.

Or perhaps you’d like to open your sustainable house as part of the open house feature.

‘Tiny homes are not just a dream,’ Ms Middleton said.

‘The tiny house movement is a reality more Australians are adopting as a means of achieving freedom from debt, minimal environmental impact, and the opportunity to live simply,’ she said.

The Sustainable House Day – Tiny Homes Design Competition is a joint project by Lismore City Council, Byron Shire Council, Ballina Shire Council, Tweed Shire Council, The Green Building Centre, Nimbin Neighbourhood & Information Centre, North Coast TAFE, Self Seed Sustainability & Dorroughby Environment Educational Centre.

 


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