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Byron Shire
December 4, 2021

Penalty rate cuts hurt food workers: Labor

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Local Labor MP Justine Elliot said the electorate of Richmond will be hard hit by the Fair Work Commission’s cut to penalty rates.
‘More than 13,000 people, or one in five workers, in Richmond work in the retail, food and accommodation industries affected by the cuts. These workers stand to lose up to $77 per week.
‘Malcolm Turnbull and his Liberal and National Party members campaigned for the Fair Work Commission to cut penalty rates. Under the Turnbull Government, wages in Australia are growing less than ever before. This latest pay cut is even more bad news for local workers and their families.
‘Retail is the second-biggest industry in Richmond, employing 7,274 workers. Food and hospitality is the third-biggest industry in Richmond, employing 6,166 workers. These cuts to penalty rates are also bad for our economy, as these workers will now have less money to spend in local shops, restaurants and other businesses,’ Justine said.


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