16.3 C
Byron Shire
October 3, 2022

Broken Head Quarry owners fined $15,000

Latest News

‘Sad and distressing’: massive numbers of bird deaths in Australian heatwaves reveal a profound loss is looming

Heatwaves linked to climate change have already led to mass deaths of birds and other wildlife around the world. To stem the loss of biodiversity as the climate warms, we need to better understand how birds respond.

Other News

NSW says ‘No’ to decriminalising drugs but pivots towards a health-based response

After waiting almost three years to respond to the recommendations of the NSW Ice Inquiry NSW Premier, Dominic Perrottet, has rejected the recommendation to decriminalise use of illicit drugs. 

Sherril claims open singles bowls championship

Sherril Pearce had the best of the day, beating Lorraine ‘Blossom’ McCormick 25–12 to win the open singles championship...

Labor leader promises to stop Murwillumbah mega-school merger if they win election

NSW Labor leader Chris Minns has promised concerned parents, teachers, and the community that if Labor win the next election they will not follow through with the mega-school merger that is currently underway in Murwillumbah.

$8.5m allocated for upgrade of Goonellabah to Wollongbar Road

Funding to investigate and upgrade the Bruxner Highway between Goonellabah and Wollongbar has been allocated by the Federal and NSW State governments.

Woman dies in multi-vehicle crash near Lismore

A woman has died in a multi-vehicle crash south-west of Lismore yesterday.

Mystery of the gospel

The word gospel means ‘good news’, and I wondered why with so many people seemingly doomed forever. Can you...

Broken Head Quarry. Photo brokenheadquarry.com.au
Broken Head Quarry. Photo brokenheadquarry.com.au

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has issued Leadshine Pty Limited with a fine of $15,000 for ongoing poor erosion and sediment controls at its Broken Head Quarry, near Byron Bay.

Examinations of the quarry ‘repeatedly’ found it had inadequate sediment controls and ‘inadequate capacity’ in its sediment control basins.

The authority went on to accuse the company of incompetent environmental management of the site and a spokesperson said that despite the authority working with the company since last year to improve standards, ‘fundamental deficiencies’ remained.

It’s not the first time the quarry has been in the news in recent years, with a proposal to build a new suburb on the degraded site, rejected by Byron Shire Council in 2014 and the Land and Environment Court last year.

EPA Regional Director North Adam Gilligan said Leadshine has ‘a responsibility to ensure that appropriate erosion and sediment controls are in place to prevent impacts on the surrounding environment.’

‘The EPA’s inspections of the Broken Head Quarry repeatedly found that sediment and erosion controls at the site were inadequate,’ Mr Gilligan said.

‘Erosion and sediment controls were poorly designed and constructed, and were not being properly maintained.

‘There was evidence that inadequate capacity was being maintained in the sediment basins to capture sediment after rainfall and a significant failure of stormwater diversion works had occurred.

‘Leadshine’s Environment Protection Licence requires that activities are carried out in a competent manner. Clearly this was not the case.’

The EPA issued Pollution Reduction Programs to the company in July and December 2016 requiring Leadshine to review and improve the sediment and erosion controls at the quarry.

Mr Gilligan said the EPA has not been satisfied with the company’s actions in response to the Pollution Reduction Programs.

‘It is disappointing that the EPA’s requirements for the controls to be improved have not been complied with.

‘The EPA has been working with Leadshine since 2016 in seeking to have the site’s sediment and erosion controls upgraded to acceptable standards, however recent inspections confirmed that fundamental deficiencies in the controls remained.

‘Sediment laden waters can have a major impact on local waterways. This shows a complete disregard for the environment, which will not be tolerated,’ Mr Gilligan said.

The EPA will continue to monitor activities at the quarry to ensure improvements are made.

 


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

CWA push for improved maternity services

The W in CWA stands for Women and the CWA have been standing up for women yet again during their recent webinar and annual Awareness Week campaign.

Chris Minns visits Kingscliff to look at floodplain development risks

The potential future risks and costs of flooding to the community and government if approved, but yet to be built, housing is allowed to go ahead in floodplains was under the spotlight last week in Kingscliff.

The Tweed Artisan Food Festival is almost here

The sixth Tweed Artisan Food Festival will be held at the end of the month – the festival runs for 10 days with 20 curated events showcasing the people, the place and the produce of the Tweed.

$30 million Aboriginal Community and Place Grants

Eligible Aboriginal community organisations and groups can apply for funding through the new solutions-focused $30 million Aboriginal Community and Place Grants program.