22.8 C
Byron Shire
May 8, 2021

Saddle Road ridge used by Aboriginals for millennia

Latest News

Join Clarkes Beach paddle out this weekend to stop massive oil and gas field project

Hundreds of local surfers and water-lovers will paddle out at Clarke’s Beach over the weekend to protest against a massive oil and gas field proposed for the NSW coast.

Other News

Upside down river

Tim Harrington, Lennox Head Letter contributor Richard White (letters 21/4/21) quite correctly identifies the Richmond River as an ‘upside down river’...

Independent wants to be Byron’s new mayor

Independent Byron Shire Councillor Basil Cameron has announced his candidature for Mayor.

House? What house? Stolen car crashes into Terranora house

Police say a house in Terranora is significantly damaged thanks to a mystery thief in a stolen car crashing into it over the weekend.

Join Clarkes Beach paddle out this weekend to stop massive oil and gas field project

Hundreds of local surfers and water-lovers will paddle out at Clarke’s Beach over the weekend to protest against a massive oil and gas field proposed for the NSW coast.

Jonson Street bus shelter gone and an era ended

Byron Shire Council says that the wooden bus shelter on Jonson Street outside the Byron Visitors Centre is being removed today with all bus services operating from the new bus interchange on Butler Street in Byron Bay

Lismore Council set to increase fees, cut costs in a bid to balance budget

Lismore City Council is set to increase fees and charges and cut spending in an attempt to overcome a $19.5m operating deficit.

Byron residents
, how would you feel if the northern gateway to our magnificent Byron district was to be disfigured by urban sprawl?

The district I refer to is the Saddle Road ridge which is an ancient bridge between the mountains and the ocean.

This ridge has been recognised and used by the Aboriginal people for thousands of years and artefacts are still being found.

This world renowned district where futurists and environmentalists from around the world come to meet regularly to discuss the plight of our planet, and the solutions to remedy it.

The Native American Indians before making a decision is acknowledged as considering seven generations into the future as to how their decisions would impact on their future generations.

I don’t think we need to look seven generations ahead to see the environmental impact that this desire for monetary profit would cause to our district.

I think our future generations would look back upon us, much as man did when he looked upon the ape, as a laughing stock and a painful embarrassment.

Do you want to give support to the destruction of this iconic district of ours which is renowned for its spiritual and environmental consciousness or be a painful embarrassment to our offspring and the world?

The choice is ours.
 Where do you stand?

Colin Hayes, Saddle Road, Mullumbimby        


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

1 COMMENT

  1. Colin,
    Yes, it’s called urban sprawl or progress by some.
    I know you’ve witnessed it many times before.

    I would guess your property is, will or may be affected.
    Thus your words are ignited by the fact that you live there or nearby.
    It is your own individual need to be protected, that motivates and causes you to write such words of concern.

    I remember, and no doubt you do too, when Byron Bay was but a small and remote beautiful coastal town.
    Look at it now, and I think few would complain, except those trying to hold onto and bring back yesterday.
    Would they rather be right or happy?

    Unfortunately it’s an inevitable fact of life, brought on by progress, development and the insatiable need of investors to make more money and profit.
    Some might call it greed, but that would be considered as being judgmental.
    It is however a largely and commonly accepted, integral part of business.

    Thousands of years ago many things were different.
    But, I would guess that today there are likely to be none, or at least very few aboriginals who would use it now as a bridge to travel between mountain and sea.
    A few occasionally found artefacts are hardly a reason to stop progress unless it’s a crucial and important ancient site.

    Sadly futurists and environmentalists mean well and have so far shown to contribute little in reality, other than perhaps hinder and cause some increases in some development costs to appease their wishes. I’m sure they will easily find another place to gather and chew the fat around their proverbial campfire.

    Regarding your reference to the purported ancient way in which the “Iroquois” Native Americans made decisions.
    This an often misused quote, and is frequently associated with the modern, popular concept of environmental stewardship, in the hope of giving weight to their own self interest arguments.

    Noble though that concept may be, but I don’t see how it contributes here.
    Sadly but true but this is a different world, and we can’t turn the clock back, progress is always upon us.
    It is what it is!

    By the way I have inserted for you below the full and apparently actual Iroquois quote:-

    “In all of your deliberations in the Confederate Council, in your efforts at law making, in all your official acts, self-interest shall be cast into oblivion.

    Cast not over your shoulder behind you the warnings of the nephews and nieces should they chide you for any error or wrong you may do, but return to the way of the Great Law which is just and right.

    Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the past and present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground – the unborn of the future Nation.”

    “I think our future generations would look back upon us as a laughing stock and a painful embarrassment.”

    Wow! Really?
    I distinctly remember those exact words being uttered many times in a large room many years ago on the LOT.

    I also remember – “what other people think of us, is none of our business!”
    (This particular quote is a great gem, by which I choose to live my life. – Thank you.)

    Those words seemed to sway many us then, but much time has since past.
    Now with much time gone by some of us have seen that some of those previously precious views were actually misconceptions and in fact irrelevant.

    By the way, I like to have a little fun when people sometimes ask me if I was a “Tree Hugger” and I usually answer, “Yes, I was!”

    However getting too many splinters in my chest inevitably changed my views about that.

    I got to see the many sides of things as the years progressed and I’m grateful.

    I trust you and Gail are well and it’s so good to see you are at least active in the community, standing up against the city dwellers cutting a path through to your Eastern bush hideaway.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Man dead after boat capsizes near Yamba

Police say a man has died and a second has been taken to hospital after a boat capsized south of Yamba this morning.

Jonson Street bus shelter gone and an era ended

Byron Shire Council says that the wooden bus shelter on Jonson Street outside the Byron Visitors Centre is being removed today with all bus services operating from the new bus interchange on Butler Street in Byron Bay

Upside down river

Tim Harrington, Lennox Head Letter contributor Richard White (letters 21/4/21) quite correctly identifies the Richmond River as an ‘upside down river’ and nowhere is this more...

Ballina Dragons’ great results at Urunga

The Ballina Dragon Boat Racing Club is a group of paddling people from all walks of life who enjoy being out on the water having fun and keeping fit.