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Byron Shire
May 18, 2021

Railway heritage amiss

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Garrett Fitzgerald, Ocean Shores

On Saturday the 2nd of November I was priviliged to attend the reopening of Railway Park Byron Bay.

Railway Park was originally created to service the railway: people waiting for passengers, passengers waiting to begin their journey or breaking their journey. Over time it became a well patronised public amenity for generations of locals, especially local Aboriginal people.

Yet, it has been neglected and overlooked by visitors and locals in more recent times.

From a railway perspective the access enhancements to Railway Park draw more attention to the heritage Byron Bay Rail station, now dormant – leased by the council, which faces an uncertain future. 

However, there is no signage or artwork indicating Byron Bay’s, and the Northern Rivers’, rich railway history. Nor indeed any sign or banner indicating the name of the park. This is a sad omission for a park with Railway in the name, that owes its very existence to the railways.


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1 COMMENT

  1. Thank goodness that the park was built in the 1920s as it was a mossie filled swamp until then . The site was filled with sand transported from near the old jetty site when the build up of sand was a nuisance and drowned infrastructure located in that area. The Railway Park was originally at least 600mm lower than what it is now going by the height of the town drain that flows under the railway corridor behind the Byron Hotbread Kitchen .

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