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Byron Shire
July 7, 2022

Good Car Co and Enova in bulk-buy partnership

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Enova Community Energy Head Energy Coach Seb Crangle and Anthony Broese van Groenou, Co-founder and director Good Car Co with some of the vehicles that will be available for a test drive at the Show & Shine event on 30 April.

Northern Rivers locals locked out of buying an electric vehicle because of cost can now access more affordable EVs through Enova Community Energy’s bulk-buy in partnership with the Good Car Co.

The Good Car Company is partnering with social enterprise Enova community energy to deliver the Northern Rivers EV bulk-buy campaign.

Good Car cofounder Anthony Broese van Groenou says that Goodcar.co works to decarbonise transport by offering access to affordable electric vehicles. ‘Hundreds of Australians are now driving 100 per cent electric cars because of the bulk-buy campaigns. The EV bulk-buy will offer more affordable access to new Polestar 2 and Hyundai EV’s as well as the import of second-hand Nissan Leafs.’

Australia’s third-largest source of greenhouse gas emissions

Enova Community Energy CEO Felicity Stening, says transport is Australia’s third-largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and cars are responsible for roughly half of these emissions. ‘Transitioning to EVs is a key piece of the climate action puzzle for Australian households however it’s been too expensive for most until now.’

Mr van Groenou says the bulk-buy campaign is very different to ordinary car sales. ‘Goodcar partners with local community groups and donates part of their profits to support community climate and sustainability action.

Expand their zero-emissions journey

‘We’re excited to offer Enova’s community of customers, shareholders, and supporters the opportunity to expand their zero-emissions journey through this bulk-buy which makes EVs more affordable.’

NSW has a suite of policies that are making electric car ownership more and more attractive. Electric cars are exempt from Stamp Duty and a $3,000 subsidy is applied to all new EV sales, further increasing EV affordability.

‘The NSW Government has committed $171 million to help build world-class electric vehicle charging infrastructure over the next four years making it super easy to drive around the state in an electric car’ said Mr van Groenou.

Felicity Stening says with rooftop solar proliferating across Australian rooftops it’s a great time for solar households to maximise the value of their solar. ‘Charging an EV during the day instead of going to the petrol station to fill up on fossil fuels is a really great way to do that.’

The Enova EV bulk buy campaign is about demystifying electric vehicles.  An EV Show & Shine Event is scheduled for the from 9am to noon on this Saturday, April 30, at the Stone and Wood Brewery, 100 Centennial Cct, Byron Bay.

Join in at  https://www.goodcar.co/community-bulk-buy/enova.


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17 COMMENTS

  1. Does Enova have an end-of-life plan for dealing with those lithium based batteries that will need to be replaced in 5 years? They are dangerous, you can’t just throw them in the dump and you can’t recycle them.

    What percentage of the price of the car will the replacement batteries cost the car owner in five years and is Enova going to subsidize the replacement of them?

    Does Enova have a plan for when the small amount of lithium available on Earth runs out?

    • I’m not sure where you getting your figures from but most EVs available now have a battery warranty of 8 years (guaranteeing at least 70% state of charge for that period). Current measurements of battery degradation in new EVs shows that they are more than likely to retain more than 80% for 10-15 years.

      So no one will be replacing batteries after 5 years and even if someone were to replace the battery once it got to 70% capacity that is still an equivalent 30-50 kWhr energy source which no one in their right mind will throw away. It could be used for powering houses or any number of uses. Also, they can be recycled but at the moment there’s not really the need.

      • My figures were the last lot of Tesla data I heard. With fast charge it was 5 years if they didn’t burst into flames first. Have these guys made them any safer yet?
        Can these ones be turned off by head office like Teslas can or are they “off grid” so to speak?

      • Apparently Good Car Co will soon be asked by the government what their end of life plan is for these batteries because EV car and home batteries are already becoming a problem.

        These Good Car Co cars only come with 7,000-kilometre mechanical warranty and a 24,000km battery warranty.
        From what I read off greenie sites, only 5% of batteries get recycled and the rest go in landfill and leech toxic waste. You can use them for a short while as stationary storage but at your own risk. You can’t run Lithium batteries to 0% storage ability, they fail long before that.

        Some battery types you only get 50% of the lithium back, some you get 70%, government subsided companies say they get 90% (sure guys), which is why mostly they just get dumped. Apparently EV makers are going to get rid of the cobalt in the batteries because that’s the expensive part. That’s the main economic incentive to recycle those batteries to start with.

        There is only enough lithium on the planet to make 500 million EV car batteries once. There are 1 billions petrol cars currently on the road.

        That’s all starting to sound like Ethanol fuel guys.

        I’ve been living off the grid for over twenty years and I have a nice line of Nickel-Iron batteries just through the wall were my feet are. If I beat the crap out of them they will last only 50 years. They are fully recyclable, and are made of cheap, plentiful materials, and there is 0% chance of them ever combusting, in fact they are fire retardant. When Lithium batteries get beaten up, they blow up. You can keep your second hand batteries of unknown damage level.
        And I’m not interested in your “Used car salesmen” friends. I’ll wait till I can get a Mr Fussion in my Porsche.

          • The 40,000 kids in the Congo sent down tiny mine shafts are the ones doing the digging to get the EV battery cobalt.

            Please tell me which points you think are made up and I will provide you with the citations for them.

    • Christian, your attempted and making up scare campaigns do you no credit.
      You tried it with solar panels, you wrong.
      Now you giving EV batteries a go, you wrong, again.

      • You try it climate catastrophe, you wrong.

        I don’t care what people think of me, I care not for any ideology, I only care about truth, even if I don’t like what I find. Make an argument.

        • Christian – Denying the truth about climate catastrophe – tick
          Christian – Making rubbish up about solar panels – tick
          Christian – Making rubbish up about life of EV batteries – tick

          Case closed.

          • Those are called assertions. That’s not an argument.
            Thanks for proving my point about you.

  2. Actually you can recycle them Christian and the life span is at least 10 years. I suggest you get out of the cave Christian, and they won’t ruin your weekend.

        • I respond with information from the manufacturers own websites, and websites that are promoting the thing I’m debunking.
          You can google the terms and you will get the pages of the proponents having to admit the facts I’m telling you (cause they don’t want to get sued later for hiding it).

          If I can read Eco-nut promotional material for 30 minutes and find fatal faults in what you are saying, maybe you should learn to do your own research. It’s not hard.

          If there is a market for something (ie Green crap) scams will pop-up to get your money. Smart scammers will admit the problems to avoid legal liability later, but they won’t point out the ramifications for you, you have to engage your brain and think it through for yourself.

          All any of you can do is shoot the messenger.

      • Your concern in relation to cobalt mining in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is noted.
        The thread for a reply is closed so here I am.

        Clearly you have not caught up with the moves to end cobalt in EV battery.
        Tesla is leading the way with the use of LFP batteries ( cobalt free ) in their EV.
        Some recent pieces for you to absorb –

        Industrial Metals / indmin.com
        FASTMARKETS IM
        By IM Staff
        Published: Thursday, 21 October 2021
        Tesla to use LFP batteries in all standard-range EVs

        United States-based carmaker Tesla will use lithium iron phosphate (LFP) batteries for its standard-range electric vehicles (EVs) globally, the company said in a quarterly update on Wednesday October 20.
        Tesla already uses LFP batteries in its standard-range Model 3, which is produced at the company’s factory in Shanghai.

        The Bull.com.au
        By Bob Kohut 24 April 2022
        Will Cobalt Remain an EV Battery Staple?

        Tesla began with the Nickel/Cobalt/Aluminum (NCA) formulation, adding the NMC and now the LFP – lithium iron phosphate, or lithium ferrophostate.

        There is no nickel or cobalt in the LFP battery.

        Tesla is using the LFP battery on entry level models and will expand its use to all “standard” range models. Where distance and performance issues like acceleration matter, Tesla will continue using the NCA formulation, for now, but plans to expand LFP use in the future. Ford and VW also have begun using LFP batteries.

        • If you read the tread above you will notice that I told ChrisR that two days ago, and he said I’m just making stuff up.
          The point I made was that Cobalt is the valuable metal that makes recycling EV batteries almost financially worth while and once that’s gone they will cost to much to recycle them. Most EV batteries are already going into landfills even with cobalt cause it’s not worth recycling them now. The total amount of lithium on the planet can make 500 Million EV batteries. The total number of cars on the road is 1 Billion. When you recycle EV batteries you only get back 50%-70% of the lithium. You need to replace these batteries at least once during the life time of each car. Figure it out.

          • Christian, ChrisR called you out for making up that EV batteries would need replacing in 5 years.
            You could have done some basic research before dumping on EV battery life.
            I’ll help you out with some Tesla EV battery information and note they don’t lose all power after 5 years and need replacing as you make out-

            Tesla Battery Warranty
            Model S (pre-2020)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / unlimited miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: N/A

            Model S (after 2020)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / 150,000 miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: 70%

            Model 3 (Standard Range)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / 100,000 miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: 70%

            Model 3 (Performance, Long Range)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / 120,000 miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: 70%

            Model X (pre-2020)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / unlimited miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: N/A

            Model X (after 2020)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / 150,000 miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: 70%

            Model Y (Performance, Long Range)
            Battery Life Length: 8 years / 120,000 miles
            Battery Capacity Retention: 70%

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