19.2 C
Byron Shire
October 25, 2021

Australian female scientists to be honoured in Paris

Latest News

4WDs multiplying on Seven Mile Beach?

Beach users in Lennox Head are reporting much higher numbers of 4WDs on Seven Mile Beach recently, along with...

Other News

NSW Education responds to Teachers Federation over Murwillumbah Education Campus staff cuts

The NSW Education Department has responded to the NSW Teachers Federation's accusation that Education Minister Sarah Mitchell has only just revealed the extent of staff cuts at the mega school.

When is a sock not a sock?

A sock is not talked about much – it’s a simple device that is very well known. As the world...

New freedom party, not Greens

I write with dismay but not surprise at the article ‘Local Greens MP Urges Vaccination.’ As a very Active ex-member...

10 point grumble

Hear hear to David Heilpern’s recent 10 point grumble, particularly points 7, 8 and 9. If the primary objective...

COVID update: two new cases in Lismore and fragments in Byron’s STP

The Northern NSW Local Health District, Lynne Weir, today say that two new cases of COVID-19 have been reported for the District to 8pm, 23 October.

Looking for men with osteoarthritis of the knee

Pain from arthritis can be debilitating and ‘is the most frequent cause of disability among adults in the developed world,’ says Professor Stephen Myers from Southern Cross University (SCU).

Professor Michelle Simmons from UNSW will be awarded €100,000 to support her cutting-edge research in quantum computing. Photo supplied.
Professor Michelle Simmons from UNSW will be awarded €100,000 to support her cutting-edge research in quantum computing. Photo supplied.

Professor Michelle Simmons from UNSW and Associate Professor Muireann Irish from the University of Sydney are both being recognised for their contribution to science in Paris, France today.

Professor Simmons is one of five 2017 Laureates who will be awarded €100,000 to support her cutting-edge research in quantum computing. Associate Professor Irish will be named one of the 2017 International Rising Talents for her Clinical Medicine work.

UNESCO Science Report Towards 2030, 2015 reported that  only 28 per cent of researchers are women and only 3 per cent of Scientific Nobel Prizes are awarded to them. Nineteen years ago L’Oréal combined forces with UNESCO to recognise Women in Science and have been committed to increasing the number of women working in scientific research.

Quantum com­puters

Professor Simmons has been been developing the computers of the future: quantum com­puters. These extremely small and powerful machines could solve certain problems in ten seconds compared to many thousands of years for a traditional computer.

This breakthrough is possible thanks to the atomic transistor. A transistor is the main com­ponent of all computers and it is the intercon­nection between millions of transistors on chips that allow electronics devices to work.

In 2012, together with her team, she broke another world record by creating a transistor made from just one atom. The same year, they succeeded in fabricating the thinnest conduct­ing doped wires in silicon. These wires are 10,000 times thinner than a human hair and are key components of an atomic-sized computer.

Associate Professor Muireann Irish from the University of Sydney will be named one of the 2017 International Rising Talents for her Clinical Medicine work. Photo supplied.
Associate Professor Muireann Irish from the University of Sydney will be named one of the 2017 International Rising Talents for her Clinical Medicine work. Photo supplied.

Alzheimers

Watching someone you love and care about suffering from the onset of Alzheimers is heartbreaking.

‘It was after seeing my grandmother suffering from the devastating effects of Alzheimer’s when I was 17 years old that I decided to pursue a research career in the field of neurodegenerative diseases, says Professor Irish.

Today she is looking at ways to recognise the the disease before it becomes the first signs of the disease appear.

‘I study the brains of pathological and non-pathological aging, and am beginning to explore changes in individuals who have a genetic predisposition for dementia, but who have no outward symptoms,’ she explained.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Julian Assange: the name that cannot be uttered

Since the news came through I have been keeping an eye and an ear out for further reporting in the mainstream media. Needless to...

NSW – bad to worse

While Gladys has left the building and we have a new religious fanatic in the top job, things are looking very grim in the...

Two views of animal welfare on the Tweed

Local MP Justine Elliot recently announced that an Albanese Labor Government will invest $1 million to build the new animal pound and rehoming centre at Lundberg Drive, South Murwillumbah.

Steve Krieg: ‘I believe that there must be change’

The 2021 NSW Local Government elections will be held on Saturday, 04 December, 2021. Restaurateur Steve Krieg is running in the hopes of being Lismore's next Mayor.