20.4 C
Byron Shire
June 24, 2024

Imprisonment of Aboriginal women ‘national crisis’

Latest News

$6.8 million Tweed pound contract awarded

The Tweed Shire Council has awarded a $6.8 million contract for design and construction of a new state-of-the-art animal pound and rehoming centre.

Other News

Ballina MP mostly welcomes state budget announcements

Greens Member for Ballina Tamara Smith has welcomed some of Labor’s funding announcements in last week’s state budget, including a new Fire and Rescue station for Byron Bay and more firies.

Spanish Film Festival

It’s fiesta time as the 2024 HSBC Spanish Film Festival, presented by Palace Cinemas, prepares to set screens alight with a superb selection of the finest new films from Spain and Latin America. The festival’s largest lineup to date opens nationally in June at Palace Cinemas.

$6.8 million Tweed pound contract awarded

The Tweed Shire Council has awarded a $6.8 million contract for design and construction of a new state-of-the-art animal pound and rehoming centre.

Occupiers of North Lismore buybacks report no eviction past deadline

Supporters of people occupying otherwise empty bought-back houses in North Lismore say Monday passed peacefully without any eviction attempts.

270 ready to contest Seas The Day women’s surfing at Kingscliff

The world’s largest female participation surf event Seas The Day is returning for its second year at Kingscliff Beach...

Daniel Mookhey walks the line with NSW budget

NSW Treasurer Daniel Mookhey's second budget in nine months, unveiled last week, was a classic Labor document in its support for education and health, somewhat brave in its slugging of property investors, and disingenuous in its blaming of the GST carve-up for the financial woes of NSW going forward.

Indig-women-reportThe over-imprisonment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is a growing national crisis that is being overlooked by all levels of government in Australia, the Human Rights Law Centre and Change the Record have said in a new report.

The imprisonment rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women has skyrocketed nearly 250 per cent since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women make up around 34 per cent of the female prison population but only 2 per cent of the adult female population.

The report, Over-represented and overlooked: the crisis of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s growing over-imprisonment, calls for system-wide change and outlines 18 recommendations to redress racialised and gendered justice system outcomes.

Antoinette Braybrook, co-chair of the Change the Record Coalition and convener of the National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services Forum, said, ‘For too long our women have been ignored by policy-makers. It is time for governments at all levels to put Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women experiences and voices front and centre, and listen to what we have to say about the solutions.

‘The report highlights the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women having access to specialist, holistic and culturally safe services and supports that address the underlying causes of imprisonment.

‘Experiences of family violence contribute directly and indirectly to women’s offending. If we are to see women’s offending rates drop, governments must invest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations that work with our women to stop violence.’

Adrianne Walters, director of legal advocacy at the Human Rights Law Centre, said, ‘The tragic and preventable death of Ms Dhu is a devastating example of what happens when the justice system fails Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Ms Dhu was locked up under draconian laws that see Aboriginal women in WA disproportionately locked up for fines they cannot pay.

‘She was treated inhumanely by police and died in their care. At a time when she most needed help, the justice system punished her.’

The report calls for governments to move away from ‘tough on crime’ approaches in reality and rhetoric, and to focus on evidence-based solutions that tackle drivers of offending and prevent women coming into contact with the justice system in the first place.

Ms Walters said, ‘Over-zealous policing and excessive police powers, driven by tough on crime politics, see too many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and men fined and locked up for minor offending. Only last month, the WA Coroner recommended the removal of police arrest and detention powers for public drinking after another Aboriginal woman died in police custody.’


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Curtains up on Byron High’s debut musical

After many months of hard work and rehearsing, Byron Bay High School students and staff  are about to perform their musical whodunnit on June...

Wallum developer welcomes arrests

The developer behind the beleaguered Wallum urban subdivision on rare and sensitive land in Brunswick Heads welcomed the recent arrests of protectors who have blockaded the site over the last four months.

Fresh police appeal for witnesses in Gage Wilson case

Police have issued a fresh public appeal for witnesses in the case of missing Mullumbimby man Gage Wilson.

Ballina MP mostly welcomes state budget announcements

Greens Member for Ballina Tamara Smith has welcomed some of Labor’s funding announcements in last week’s state budget, including a new Fire and Rescue station for Byron Bay and more firies.