22.7 C
Byron Shire
October 22, 2021

Owner of menacing dog fined over Federal attack

Latest News

NSW Legislative Council expresses concerns over push to burn native forests for power

The NSW Legislative Council unanimously passed a motion expressing its concerns over the growing push by industry to burn NSW native forests for electricity and hydrogen production.

Other News

Egotistic rabble

Strident anti-vaxxers claim that COVID-19 vaccination violates their individual sovereignty and freedom. However, there’s not a beep from them...

When is a sock not a sock?

A sock is not talked about much – it’s a simple device that is very well known. As the world...

No means no, say traditional owners

As Water Week draws to a close, with a theme of 'Caring for Water and Country', a group of Widjabul Wia-bal elders have emphatically said they do not want the Dunoon Dam proposal to be put back on the table by pro-dam councillors.

Poison killing wildlife

Take bird-killing poisons off our supermarket and hardware shelves. Rodent poison containing SGAR is having a devastating effect on...

STP inches closer

Paul Bibby’s article ‘Ocean Shores STP (OS STP) inches closer to closure’ (6 October) raises some questions with me...

Truth

The truth doesn’t mind being questioned. A lie does. Margot Hays, Bangalow

Byron Shire Council has won a court case against a dog-owner whose pet bit another dog while unmuzzled and off the leash, despite already having been warned about his animal.

The man, from Federal, has been convicted of being in charge of a menacing dog that attacked another dog and ordered to pay Byron Shire Council’s legal costs, a fine and compensation totalling $1,500.

The attack happened near the Federal Hall just before 8:30am on August 15 when the dog, an American Staffordshire terrier, attacked another dog, a Spoodle, being walked on a leash.

The Council’s legal services coordinator, Ralph James, said the dog bit the Spoodle on the ear, the neck and on the back.

‘The court at Mullumbimby heard the attacking dog was not secured on a leash nor was it wearing a muzzle,’ Mr James said.

‘This animal is known to Byron Shire Council as it was declared “menacing” in 2014, and this means the owner is required to muzzle the dog, keep it on a leash when in public places and ensure it is in the control of a responsible adult,’ he said.

‘It was a frightening incident for the other person involved and it’s important for people to know there are very harsh penalties in place for the owners of dogs who are menacing and dangerous,’ he said.

‘Aside from paying the council’s legal costs and a fine, the defendant also has to pay a $450 vet bill for the injured Spoodle.

‘The maximum penalties for dog-related offences under the Companion Animals Act is a fine of up to $70,000 and a gaol term of up to five years,’ Mr James said.

For more information call Malcolm Hamilton, Animal Enforcement Officer at Byron Shire Council, on 6626 7000.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Diadem Street, Lismore

Around 2,000 residents in Lismore lost their electricity connection on Wednesday night after a large gum tree took out power lines.

Black bellied whale sighted at Ballina dubbed ‘Liquorice’

For years southern waters whale watchers have been keeping their eyes keen for Migaloo and his offspring, but just how many local cetacean enthusiasts...

A history of ‘freedom’ and the Northern Rivers vaccine divide

Among the many myths about the COVID-19 vaccines is a belief they contain live virus that a vaccinated person will shed in social and intimate circumstances. Along with many other vaccine myths, this belief is contributing to a significant divide in the Northern Rivers community.

No means no, say traditional owners

As Water Week draws to a close, with a theme of 'Caring for Water and Country', a group of Widjabul Wia-bal elders have emphatically said they do not want the Dunoon Dam proposal to be put back on the table by pro-dam councillors.