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Forest destruction coming your way: Lismore public meeting

Logging Dieback the Premiers Department does not want to see. Photo NEFA

Proposed changes to the NSW logging rules will remove protections for most threatened species, open up protected old-growth forest for logging, allow intensified logging, establish a clear-felling zone, and reduce buffers on headwater streams.

‘Tens of thousands of hectares of our precious public forests are already suffering from ecosystem collapse, being converted into seas of lantana overtopped by dead and dying trees. Their biodiversity and timber values are being destroyed,’ NEFA spokesperson Dailan Pugh said.

‘The dieback is so severe that five State Forests* around Woodenbong are “considered impractical to manage for commercial purposes”. There are many others similarly degraded.

‘We need to stop the Forestry Corporation from perpetuating their degradation and begin rehabilitating these valuable public assets before it is too late.’

Get informed

The North East Forest Alliance, North Coast Environment Council and local groups have been hosting a series of public meetings to inform the community about the NSW and Commonwealth government’s proposals to change the rules governing logging of public lands to remove protections.

‘With a new Regional Forest Agreement and Wood Supply Agreements the governments are intending to lock up our public forests for loggers for another 20 years, and they are proposing to slash environmental protections to increase logging volumes,’ Mr Pugh said.

‘This is the last chance that the community has to have a say in the management of our public forests for the next 20 years.

‘We have so far hosted successful public meetings at Port Macquarie, Bellingen, Kyogle, Murwillumbah, Nimbin and Coffs Harbour. On Thursday night in Coffs Harbour 100 people were shocked to hear what the NSW and Commonwealth governments have in store for our public forests.

‘It will be Lismores turn on Tuesday night at 5:30 pm at the Workers Club to find out more about what the governments are intending.

‘We urge people to come along on Tuesday night to find out more about the government’s dire proposals for our public native forests,’ Mr. Pugh said

Further public meetings are being planned for Grafton, Nambucca Heads and Newcastle.

* Donaldson, Mount Lindsay, Unumgar, Bald Knob and Woodenbong State Forests. Natural Resources Commission (2016 p54)


5 responses to “Forest destruction coming your way: Lismore public meeting”

  1. Deon Demouche says:

    and the madness of this backwards government continues!

  2. joan says:

    How can these government depts. live with themselves knowing that fauna and flora are being destroyed by logging and they are giving the go ahead for more logging to take place. it is disgusting that animals and plants insects etc. have to suffer because of the almighty dollar comes first at all times. Why are they not growing forest for logging (Pine trees) or fast growing trees. Shame on you.

  3. daniele voinot says:

    We have to stop NSW government destroying our forest and handing our 11 million a years to logging companies because of a QUOTA of trees it promised years ago to wood lobbyists . All wood products are to be made from sustainable plantation timber and use industrial hemp to make toilet paper . Daniele

  4. Steve Fletcher says:

    My wife and I will be in Lismore Tuesday night in support of the environment!

  5. As we watch more hectares of camphor laurel being poisoned in our valleys, why are they not being value added into viable products? Every growing tree has the capacity to capture 20 tons of carbon from the atmosphere. Much better to leave any so called invasive in the ground until it can be successfully harvested for human use.

    Climate change is about adaptation, not adding another poison into our whole environment.

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