12.6 C
Byron Shire
July 13, 2024

What the Frack happened at Gloucester?

Latest News

Losing town water access

I grew up and live in Mullumbimby, and I know locals have a strong opinion about the Byron Shire...

Other News

New Byron fire station afoot

The NSW Labor government has allocated $8.2 million in its 2024–25 budget for a new Fire and Rescue NSW (FRNSW) station in Byron Bay.

Presidential act?

Everyone is talking about what Trump can get away with now a president is protected by immunity for official...

AMBER ALERT: Missing Children, Paradise Point

The Queensland Police Service is seeking urgent public assistance to help locate a 3-year-old girl, 5-year-old boy and 6-year-old boy who went missing from Victor Avenue in Paradise Point at 4pm yesterday, who may be at significant risk.

Playing with fire

Their excitement is infectious. Young schoolboys in uniform cluster around Rebecca Barnes’ stall as she passes the finger limes...

NAIDOC WEEK: Bundjalung art on show

Coinciding with NAIDOC week celebrations, Longstanding will be at the Lone Goat Gallery, located at the Byron Library until August 17.

Coopers Shoot wedding venue proposed 

Another local holiday accommodation operator is looking to cash in on the lucrative rural wedding market, this time in Coopers Shoot. 

Lock the Gate's Elly Bird and Dean Draper with events speakers Gloucester valley resident Nicky Coombes and beef farmers Ed and Tina Robinson, Dan Robbins and GetUp Better Power project manager Lily Dempster. Photo Eve Jeffery.
(Left-to right) GetUp Better Power project manager Lily Dempster, Lock the Gate’s Elly Bird and Dean Draper, with event speakers Gloucester Valley resident Nicky Coombes and beef farmers Ed and Tina Robinson and Dan Robbins. Photo Eve Jeffery.

Story and photos Eve Jeffery

Tina and Ed Robinson moved to Gloucester on the mid north coast about 20 years ago in the hope of living a lovely riparian life as beef farmers.

They didn’t ever imagine they would become activists travelling the country pleading with all they meet to help them stand up to a company called AGL which wants to frack the region for coal-seam gas (CSG).

Tina and Ed Robinson were featured speakers at a packed house for last Friday’s What The Frack Happened Gloucester? in Mullumbimby. Photo Eve Jeffery.
Tina and Ed Robinson were featured speakers at a packed house for last Friday’s What The Frack Happened Gloucester? in Mullumbimby. Photo Eve Jeffery.

Tina and Ed were featured speakers at a packed house for last Friday’s ‘What The Frack Happened At Gloucester?’ event in Mullumbimby. 

They were joined by campaigners from Lock the Gate and GetUp!

Last week mining giant AGL announced it would sell back three of its CSG licences to the NSW government, and that it would write-down $193 milllion in the value of its Gloucester gas project.

The further delay to the company’s final investment decision for CSG at Gloucester was welcomed by communities no longer under active licences.

But campaigners say that for the people of Gloucester, it’s not over yet as they are still living with the daily reality of pilot production wells on their doorstep and ongoing uncertainty about the future of the project that could ruin their valley.

Mr Robinson said northern rivers locals had been ‘a great support to us’.

‘Our community is very small and we are up against a large company,’ Mr Robinson said.

‘We’re in a difficult situation; the rules the government has put in place for everywhere else in NSW don’t apply to us because the Waukivory gas project was already underway when they made them,’ he said.

‘If this project goes ahead in our valley, people in our community may have to live with wells only 200 metres from their homes,’ he said.

Lock the Gate Western Sydney coordinator Dan Robbins spoke about the health issues associated with CSG mining. Photo Eve Jeffery.
Lock the Gate Western Sydney coordinator Dan Robbins spoke about the health issues associated with CSG mining. Photo Eve Jeffery.

Elly Bird, regional coordinator for Gasfield Free Northern Rivers, said another speaker, Dan Robbins, has been working with communities in Camden, where AGL operate the largest producing gasfield in NSW.

‘Dan has been documenting a worrying pattern of health symptoms; some people there are living only 45 metres from gas wells,’ Ms Bird said.

‘Our fight isn’t over yet and there’s plenty people can do to help,’ she said.

‘There are some really simple things people can do that can make a difference, including switching their power away from power companies, like AGL, that invest in CSG.’


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Lavertys Gap history

The Lavertys Gap hydro power station was installed in 1919. In 1939, during the Great Depression, people had no money, and Council decided to...

Electricity lines clipped and lines come down in Lismore

Police have confirmed that a truck clipped powerlines today on Dawson Street, Lismore. 

NSW Drug Summit announced – finally

The NSW Labor government has finally delivered on their election promise to hold a NSW Drug Summit that will take place this year. 

Getting the word out on wildlife

The Young and Wild project by young women and run by Byron Youth Service (BYS) has produced wildlife stickers and murals, all to raise awareness of the plight of our native animals.