13.8 C
Byron Shire
June 24, 2021

Tim Flannery on how to feed, power and clean up the world

Latest News

Disrupt fossil fuels

Duncan Dey, Main Arm I disrupt coal in a few ways, including by living and working off-grid (solar panels and big...

Other News

Mental health workshop for girls in Lennox

The mental health organisation Beautiful Minds is holding a one day workshop for pre-teen girls in Lennox Head on Sunday 27 June 2021.

Massive multi-dwelling Paterson Street DA before Planning Panel

The Northern Regional Planning Panel (NRPP), an unelected consent authority that overrides Council decision making, will be considering a...

Locals to fight back with a series about the REAL Byron Bay

News that Netflix was planning to film a vacuous docudrama in Byron Bay brought a collective snort of derision across the Shire.

‘Technically no longer human’ – can mRNA COVID-19 vaccines meld with your DNA?

It’s becoming increasingly common to see social media posts claiming that the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, which include those made by Pfizer and Moderna, could alter a person’s DNA.

Lambruk: Local gourmet providore

S Haslam Lambruk Pantry is a local gourmet providore based in the heart of the Byron Shire. They create a...

Echo ad leads to AVO arrest of Council activist

Vocal Council critic and longtime activist, John Anderson, aka Fast Buck$, was arrested last Friday night for allegedly breaching his Apprehended Violence Order (AVO) by an Echo ad.

Tim Flannery. Photo by Damien Pleming.
Tim Flannery. Photo by Damien Pleming.

Scientist, explorer and conservationist Tim Flannery is a leading writer on climate change and the 2007 Australian of the Year. His books include the award-winning international bestseller The Weather Makers, Here on Earth and Atmosphere of Hope. He is currently head of the Climate Council.

In his new book Sunlight and Seaweed Tim Flannery investigates exciting new technologies currently being developed to address our most pressing environmental threats, presenting a positive future for us and our planet.

Climate change, food production and toxic pollution present huge challenges, but, as Flannery shows, we already have innovative, practical and inspiring solutions.

Sunlight and Seaweed by Tim Flannery.
Sunlight and Seaweed by Tim Flannery.

‘Much of my recent writing has spelled out a message of hope for the future. It is clear to me that even with the climate crisis assuming its current frightening proportions, and with billions more people on our finite planet, that life in 2050 can be much better than it is today, and the state of our biodiversity and ecosystems much improved,’ says Flannery. ‘But hope is not enough. We need a coherent vision of the future that is capable of guiding investments in clean technologies so that hope can be turned into concrete reality.’

Solar energy has, until now, been limited to supplying power only when the sun is shining. But new technology using concentrated sunlight to provide intense heat energy that can be effectively stored overcomes this problem, providing clean renewable power around the clock. Further, the large amounts of power produced can be used beyond our current power demands to tackle the issue of feeding the world’s growing population – by enabling energy-intense methods of purifying polluted land for agricultural production.

Drawing carbon out of the atmosphere has become an essential component in limiting climate change. Flannery explores the potential of kelp, a fast-growing sea alga, to be used on a large scale to convert carbon from the air to a non-gaseous form, reducing levels of atmospheric carbon.

 

• Tim Flannery will be appearing at Byron Writers Festival in conversation with Paul Barclay (Saturday) and at Stories from Nature’s Great Connectors with David Haskell and Nicolas Rothwell (Sunday).

• For more on Byron Writers Festival visit byronwritersfestival.com


More Byron Writers Festival 2017 articles:

Tex Talks

Tex is a funny prick. In an industry full of people who take themselves SO seriously, Perkins is a breath of fresh air.

1

The life and times of Jimmy Barnes

Interview with Mandy Nolan “I didn’t write the story hoping for forgiveness. I wrote it hoping for life.” Prolific songwriter and performer, Jimmy Barnes has been a storyteller for more than 40 years, sharing his life and passions with Australians of...

0

Book Reviews by Byron Bay Public School Students

Grace Author: Morris Gleitzman Reviewed by: Billie Aitken-McGregor Class: Age 11 Byron Bay Public School  “We were a happy family. We were bountiful. But it came to pass that I started doing sins. And that’s when all our problems began.” Imagine having your father taken...

0

The Reef, trees and stars at Writers Festival

This year’s Byron Writers Festival hosts a range of conversations for those interested in delving into the environment, astronomy and science, led by some of the world’s leading scientific minds. From discoveries made below the waterline, to those made...

0

Terrorism, politics and betrayals collide in debut novel from Tony Jones

Tony Jones was still at school when Lionel Murphy raided ASIO. After an ABC cadetship, he joined Four Corners as a reporter in 1985, and later Dateline at SBS in 1986. He subsequently was an ABC foreign correspondent, for...

0

Robert Drewe releases new novel, Whipbird

Bangalow local Robert Drewe is an Australian literary legend whose more than 20 highly acclaimed books, including novels, short stories and memoirs have won state, national and international prizes, been widely translated, and been adapted for film, television, theatre...

0

Time for Rock’n’Roll at Byron Writers Festival

Byron Writers Festival will feature stars of the Australian music industry who not only can hold a tune but also can hold a pen, and have written or co-written revealing memoirs, and a novel. Read on for more about...

0

Cosentino’s greatest trick may not be what you think

Trapped underwater in agonising pain, shackled and sinking and desperately trying not to give in to the urgent need to breathe, I really thought maybe I had pushed myself too far this time. The scar was still fresh from...

0

There’s a kids’ big day out at Byron Writers Festival

Byron Writers Festival has pulled out all stops to create a day full of fun, inspiration and creativity to ignite the imaginations of children. Seven acclaimed children’s authors will face their toughest and most vocal audience at the Greenstone...

0

A beginner’s guide to the Byron Writers Festival

Never been to Byron Writers Festival? We ask Byron resident and festival-lover Emily Brugman, 27, her top tips for the first-time festival-goer.   Tell us a bit about the festival. The Byron Writers Festival is a three-day event that brings writers and...

0


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Water diversity

John Revington, The Channon A big thank you to Rous County Council (RCC) for acting quickly on the preliminary planning and implementation of the diverse water...

Cr Jeff Johnson calls for affordable housing initiative

Ballina's Cr Jeff Johnson has a housing proposal for Ballina Council which will be discussed at today's meeting, following a recent workshop with Social Futures and North Coast Community Housing.

The knives are out

Paul Brecht, Evans Head Reading the letters section of The Echo I came across the two councillor’s Martin and Ndiaye and also Kate Coxall...

Comment: Vigil for Canadian genocide that resonates closer to home

Yesterday, in solidarity with the Indigenous Peoples of Canada, members of the Tweed community held a ceremony at the Sacred Heart Church in Murwillumbah.