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Byron Shire
May 18, 2021

In the chaos of India, an unlikely friendship is born

Latest News

Independent councillor to represent Byron’s water security

Mia Armitage Independent Byron Shire Councillor Cate Coorey says she’s excited to have won the council’s vote for a new...

Other News

All fired up: former magistrate fumes at news of the world

How does one react to news of environmental vandalism, rampant domestic violence and mutilation of women without anger or distress?

Butler Street Reserve checked for PFAS pollution

Authorities are checking the Byron Bay site for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, more commonly known as PFAS.

Locals call for automatic revocation of speeding fines on Hinterland Way in first half of April

When local man Nathan Hicks saw posts on Facebook about locals who had received fines they believed were incorrect he decided to look into challenging his own fine. 

A confusion of letters in Ocean Shores

Apparently, there is another Ocean Shores in another part of the world, and they have deer…

Water and the dam

Dr Roslyn Irwin, Caniaba An organisation called ‘Our Future NR’ is distributing and promoting information intended to put the Dunoon...

School Strike for Climate next Friday

Next Friday from 10am Byron Shire students will be demanding political action on the climate emergency in what they and their supporters say is our present, future and reality. 

Barbara Carmichael and Tarun.

Written in a warm, conversational style as if the author is sharing a cup of chai with the reader, Barbara Carmichael’s new travel memoir I’ve Come to Say Goodbye weaves its way through the people and places visited in her travels of India over the past ten years. Much of her story is based in the lake city of Udaipur, where she meets Tarun and his family, and it is through their eyes that she falls in love with India. Barbara’s friendship with Tarun strengthens with each visit.

Her adventures are many and varied. She is run over by a rickshaw in Jaipur; booked into a hotel in Delhi that is in its final stages of demolition and sleeps with her bag against the door while bricks fall around her. On a night train to Jodhpur, she awakes to find four men standing at the end of her bed watching her sleep. She takes a holiday with Tarun, his wife and young son. Little does she know that it will be the last time she will share with her Indian brother. When she receives the sad news of his death, she knows she must go back to Udaipur. It’s the only way she can say goodbye.

Book launch at The Book Room Byron – 6pm 8 Feb. Book reading followed by Q&A with author, Barbara Carmichael. www.barbaracarmichael.com.au

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Butler Street Reserve checked for PFAS pollution

Authorities are checking the Byron Bay site for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, more commonly known as PFAS.

Quarry comes up against the farmers of Bentley

You would need to be a pretty tough customer to come up against the Bentley farmers, yet, that is exactly what Rob and Sarah McKenzie, the operators of the Bentley Quarry, what they say is a local, family-operated business, are doing.

All fired up: former magistrate fumes at news of the world

How does one react to news of environmental vandalism, rampant domestic violence and mutilation of women without anger or distress?

Business calls for Tweed train tracks to be kept ignored

More than 800 people had signed a petition calling for a new rail trail to be built next to, rather than in place of, the existing disused railway line running through the shire.