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Byron Shire
April 11, 2021

Pacific Ale court action

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A win for the roughy

The battle for the 'roughy had been a tough road for conservationists and hopefully this win will be the last fight.

Other News

Big swinging dicks

Keith Duncan, Pimlico After the tumultuous events of the past weeks regarding alleged sexual assaults within the Liberal Party and...

Northern Rivers COVID restrictions lifting at midnight

NSW Health has confirmed that COVID-related restrictions for the Northern Rivers will be lifted at midnight tonight (Monday 5 April).

Murwillumbah Arts Trail coming in May

The sixth Murwillumbah Arts Trail is all set for the weekend of 29-30 May 2021. From its beginnings in 2015, the arts trail has grown to be a major festival for the visual arts, as well as a vibrant community event.

ANZAC Day with a difference in Lismore

The Northern Rivers peace group ‘Remembering and Healing’ (RaH), now in its twelfth year, is organising two public events for ANZAC Day to remember the suffering war brings on all sides, and to make a strong commitment to peace and non-violence.

Local teams head north under new set-up for women’s AFL 

Local women’s AFL will have a shake-up this year as the Lismore Swans join the Northern Rivers league...

New food donation campaign launched

A new campaign is set to make a big difference in helping to reduce waste and provide more food security for our region.

Stone & Wood and Thunder Road labels

Stone and Wood has lost an appeal against Melbourne-based Thunder Road Brewing Co, with the Federal Court deciding Monday morning that even though the hugely successful Stone & Wood Pacific Ale had a registered trade mark, the Thunder Road Pacific Ale launched in 2015 did not infringe that.  The local brewer was also unsuccessful in its claims of misleading and deceptive conduct and ‘passing off’.

The judges commented, amongst other things, that the prominence of the ‘Stone & Wood’ logo on the label made it unlikely that consumers would order a product thinking it was the other. They also commented that ‘Pacific’ was a ‘descriptive’ word, and that those using descriptive words take the risk that others in the trade would use the same word descriptively and thus not distinguish the product.

The Stone & Wood product is made and bottled in the northern rivers; the Thunder Road product comes from Belgium.

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Maybe Canberra needs a bit of distraction biff

Mick breathed in but his Cronulla Sharks football jersey struggled to contain his well-insulated six-pack and he held up his hand as he approached Bazza in the front bar of the Top Pub.

Council crews working hard to repair potholes

Tweed Shire Council road maintenance crews are out across the Tweed's road network repairing potholes and other damage caused by the recent prolonged rainfall and previous flood events.

Poor Pauline

Bob Vinnicombe, Sefton A lot of hypocrisy from Labor and The Greens about respect for women. Look at the treatment they dished out to Pauline...

New film celebrates getting back outside

'Free From Lockdown: Back Out in Nature' is a new short film in which a group of disabled and non-disabled performers from the Northern Rivers celebrate being in nature after COVID lockdown.