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Byron Shire
June 15, 2024

Cinema Reviews: Sometimes Always Never

Latest News

Housing waiting lists jump over 100 per cent for Northern Rivers

Crisis response needed from NSW state government as listings for priority housing increase over 100 per cent in multiple Northern Rivers regions.

Other News

Jagun Alliance – rebuilding Indigenous knowledge

Sustainability is intrinsic to Aboriginal cultural frameworks, all ways of being, knowing and doing. It’s about being in the right relationship with Country, and all the endemic species being in the right relationships, in the kinship Country for Country, Jagun.

Mullet fishers destroy dunes and native plants at Gawandii Beach, Shaws Bay

Locals and Tuckombil Landcare have expressed concerns over damage to the dunes at Gawandii Beach at Shaws Bay by fisher people who are accessing the beach for the mullet harvesting season. 

Ballina Council join study to understand water use

Ballina Council has joined Bathurst, Dubbo and the Murray River Council areas to participate in a cutting-edge artificial intelligence technology that aims to identify how people use water across regional NSW. 

Indonesian street food at the Mullum Farmers Market

Rini and Ewan – should they ever find the time – don’t need to add new items to their regular menu.

Cinema: The Way, My Way

This is the charming and captivating true story of a stubborn, self-centred Australian man who decides to walk the 800-kilometre-long Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route through Spain.

Broken Head Quarry development plan rears its head once again

Long-dormant plans to turn the former Broken Head Quarry site into a residential development have lumbered out of the bush like a bewildered dinosaur.

‘Letting go’ is never easy. No matter how traumatic an experience, how heartbreaking a loss, some find it virtually impossible to be free of its torment. Alan (Bill Nighy with a Scouse accent) is one such person.  Obsessed with finding Michael, the son who has vanished from his life, he is untroubled by the corrosive effect his quest has had on his other son, Peter (Sam Riley). The film starts bleakly, with the pair having met to identify a body which might be that of the missing boy. In a hotel the night before, over a game of Scrabble – it provides the leitmotif of the movie – they befriend a couple who turn out to be in town for the same reason. And it’s at this point that you become aware of the off-beat humour that director Carl Hunter insinuates into so many scenes – the tale of the old lady who sold coal is a classic. It is visually jokey too, as Alan and Peter drive a little red Triumph through the countryside, but with the back-projection of passing trees accentuated for its fakery. Likewise, there are numerous shots where Hunter seems to have gone out of his way to unbalance or even discomfit the viewer through off-centre framing. Once you have adjusted to the visual style, which perfectly complements Nighy’s uniquely skewed delivery, you find that you have been drawn deeply into the story’s intimacy. Alan wins you over, as he does Peter’s wife Sue (Alice Lowe) and their teenage son, Jack (Louis Healy), whom he helps overcome shyness to woo the cute girl at the bus-stop. But the rift with Peter only widens. After Scrabbling online with an opponent whom he is convinced is Michael, Alan arranges a rendezvous. The ending, in which Alan belatedly discovers that he has not seen the forest for the trees, is a beautiful lesson for us all to be reminded of. With Nighy in top form and the ageless Jenny Agutter making a welcome return to the screen, this one is a beauty.


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Mullet fishers destroy dunes and native plants at Gawandii Beach, Shaws Bay

Locals and Tuckombil Landcare have expressed concerns over damage to the dunes at Gawandii Beach at Shaws Bay by fisher people who are accessing the beach for the mullet harvesting season. 

Flood-prone land subdivision DA on exhibition

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