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Byron Shire
March 6, 2021

Bangalow Kollective

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Tracey Stride, Coorabell

I lived in a new development called The Kollective in Byron Bay for a while and would have liked to stay because I liked the ideals of the developers. However, it turned out to be a misnomer to liken it to a ‘collective’. It was too densely packed, with no insulation – including against noisy neighbours.

They couldn’t get people to stay long term, including me, so it ended up being populated with backpackers who couldn’t afford the rent for a one bedroom place. Therefore, they packed three and sometimes four people into those tasteful, utilitarian, but tiny places.

Twenty or so units, 10 car spaces, and tenants who – for the most part didn’t give a stuff about their neighbours; they were in party mode. Can you imagine?

It was completely overrun with cars – and if you have a look at the two nearly side by side at 18 Sunrise Boulevard in Byron, you’ll know what I mean. It is even worse down there now that Airbnb has moved in, and there are eight tenants, most with cars, in a four bedroom house.

For those in or near Bangalow – don’t let them in! Protest! It’s a future slum.

Write to the developers at and ask them why they feel the need to take legal action when their massive over-development is approved? I just did.

Why not negotiate? Threatening legal action is now a strategy for The Kollective. Why? Why is it even allowed in local communities? Forced mediation until a resolution is reached is less costly. Of course compromise will be required from both sides… but still, surely we can do better, all of us?


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