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Lest we forget

Adrian O’Loughlan. Photo Jeff Dawson

Mullumbimby Services sub-branch acting secretary Adrian O’Loughlan says ANZAC Day, to be held this Saturday, will not be the usual national day of remembrance for those who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.

Owing to COVID-19, there will be no dawn service or mid-morning parade.

‘This doesn’t mean ANZAC Day is cancelled,’ Mr O’Loughlan said.

‘It means it will be different. People can still lay wreaths and remember our fallen, but we must abide by the NSW government social distancing laws.’

The service will still be observed at 6am but they are asking that you stand in your driveways in solidarity. 

‘So on ANZAC Day to keep our community spirit strong at 0600 hours let us all stand in solidarity at the end of our driveways, united in sharing our respect with one minute’s silence. And then perhaps a wave and at all your neighbours,’ he said.

‘From Mullumbimby RSL sub branch to the Byron Shire community: stay strong and safe on ANZAC Day, 2020. Less we forget.’


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6 responses to “Lest we forget”

  1. Barry says:

    I will be having a sleep in.

  2. Andrew Bennett says:

    I oppose wars and do not glorify them, I will be sleeping in.

  3. Joan says:

    i will be standing at the top my drive, with my candle, a poppy and rosemary plus flying an Australian flag on my veranda.

  4. Mark May says:

    Good onya Joan – Lest We Forget

  5. deborah & mick stacey says:

    This is a few words, to remind us of the misery and futility of war, which is a great loss for ordinary people, but a gain for a few priveleged ones.

    1917 written by David Olney

    “The strange young man who comes to me
    A soldier on a three-day spree
    Who needs one night’s cheap ecstasy
    And a woman’s arms to hide him

    He greets me with a courtly bow
    And hides his pain by acting proud
    He drinks too much and he laughs too loud
    How can I deny him ?

    Let us dance beneath the moon
    I’ll sing to you “Claire de Lune”
    The morning always comes too soon
    But tonight the war is over

    He speaks to me in schoolboy French
    Of a soldiers life inside a trench
    Of the look of death and ghastly stench
    I do my best to please him

    He puts two roses in a vase
    Two roses sadly out of place
    Like the gallant smile on his haggard face
    Playfully I tease him

    Hold me ‘neath the Paris skies
    Let’s not talk of how or why
    Tomorrow’s soon enough to die
    But tonight the war is over

    We make love too hard, too fast
    He falls asleep, his face a mask
    He wakes with the shakes and he drinks from his flask
    I put my arms around him

    They die in in the trenches and they die in the air
    In Belgium and France the dead are everywhere
    They die so fast there’s no time to prepare
    A decent grave to surround them

    Old world glory, old world fame
    The old world’s gone, gone up in flames
    Nothing will ever be the same
    And nothing lasts forever

    Oh I’d pray for him but I’ve forgotton how
    And there’s nothing , nothing that can save him now
    There’s always another with the same funny bow
    And who am I to deny them

    Lux aeterna Luce-ar e-is
    Domine cum sanctis tu-is in aeternum
    qui-a pius es
    Requiem aeternaum dona e-is Domine
    qui-pius es
    et lux perpetua luce-at e-is Cum sanctis tu-is in aeternum qui-a pi-us es
    Tonight the war is over ?”

    This goes out to my grandad who served in Gallopoli, my dad Papua New Guinea, and Len Stacey who served in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, all of whom died at a young age; the conscientious objectors, people who work for peace, all the victims of war in the modern age and no less Mother Gaia. And of course the TRUTH, which is always the first victim of war.

  6. deborah & mick stacey says:

    This is a few words, to remind us of the misery and futility of war, which is a great loss to ordinary people, but a gain for a priveleged few.

    1917 Written by David Olney

    “The strange young man who comes to me
    A soldier on a three day spree
    Who needs one night’s cheap ecstasy
    And a women’s arms to hide him

    He greets me with a courtly bow
    And hides his pain by acting proud
    He drinks too much and he laughs too loud
    How can I deny him ?

    Let us dance beneath the moon
    I’ll sing to you “Claire de Lune”
    The morning always comes too soon
    But tonight the war is over

    He speaks to me in schoolboy French
    Of a soldiers life inside a trench
    Of the look of death and ghastly stench
    I do my best to please him

    He puts two roses in a vase
    Two roses sadly out of place
    Like the gallant smile on his haggard face
    Playfully I please him

    Hold me ‘neath the Paris skies
    Let’s not talk of how or why
    Tomorrow’s soon enough to die
    But tonight the war is over

    We make love too hard, too fast
    He falls asleep, his face a mask
    He wakes with the shakes and he drinks from his flask
    I put my arms around him

    They die in the trenches and they die in the air
    In Belgium and France the dead are everywhere
    They die so fast there’s no time to prepare
    A decent grave to surround them

    Old world glory, old world fame
    The old world’s gone, gone up in flames
    Nothing will ever be the same
    And nothing lasts forever

    Oh I’d pray for him but I’ve forgotton how
    And there’s nothing, nothing that can save him now
    There’s always another with the same funny bow
    And who am I to deny them

    Lux aeterna Luce-at e-is
    Domine cum sanctis tu-is aeternum,
    qui-a pius es
    Requim aeternaum dona e-is Domine
    qui-a pius es
    et lux perpetua luce-at e-is Cum sanctis tu-is in aeternum qui-a pi-us es
    Tonight the war is over ?”

    This goes out to my grandad who served in Gallopoli, my dad Papua New Guinea and Len Stacey who served in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, (all of whom died at a young age as a result); the conscientious objectors, people who work for Peace, and all the victims of war in the modern age, and no less Mother Gaia. And of course the TRUTH which is always the first victim of war !

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