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Southern beaches saga continues

Patchs Beach 4WD entrance blocked. Photo supplied.

The 4WD entrance to Patchs Beach remains closed, as promised by Ballina Council, but residents have told Echonetdaily that there are still too many 4WDs and motorbikes on the beaches south of Ballina, with inadequate communication to the public from Council about why change is necessary.

Stephen Totterman from Coastal Defenders Network has been collecting data on compliance from drivers and campers and said there are ongoing social and environmental impacts which need to be addressed.

‘The idea that misbehaving drivers are the problem leads towards increased enforcement and/or permits and the beach remains open,’ he said. ‘We don’t want to see rangers and police on the beach and we find the beach safer and more peaceful without the 4WD traffic.’

New tracks

Mr Totterman has written to Crown Lands, National Parks and Ballina Council about his concerns about a horse track recently built without a DA between the Sugar Beach Polo Club (also known as the Surfing Cowboys) and the beach, via the Crown Reserve and the existing Tuckeroo Trail.  He said the horse track adjoins the Richmond River Nature Reserve, and has damaged coastal vegetation.

Pied oystercatcher looking for food, South Ballina Beach. Photo supplied.

‘The new horse track is a concern because it comes out on to the beach in the middle of a long-term oystercatcher territory,’ said Mr Totterman.

He pointed out that BirdLife Australia has been actively campaigning against commercial horse training on beaches in Victoria because of threats to sea bird nests.

Locally, endangered pied oystercatcher chicks are known to hide in shallow depressions and are at risk of being trampled.

Mr Totterman says there are dozens of informal beach tracks through the Crown Reserve, with the area becoming a ‘free for all’.

He has written to the authorities about an additional illegal beach track at South Ballina Beach (at 263 Sneesbys Lane), but no serious action has been taken as yet by Council or Crown Lands.

Links in the chain

Local resident Megan Ward said every track through the dunes weakens the ecosystem of the beach. ‘Think of a chain, you take out just one link, and the entire integrity of the system collapses,’ she said.

‘That is the effect of every 4WD track to any beach. The question is, do our beaches have the capacity to withstand this? And the answer is no.’

4WDs are particularly destructive to dunes at high tide. Photo supplied.

She said she recently spoke to a man driving through fragile South Ballina beach dunes at high tide with a dog off-leash who had no idea he was doing the wrong thing.

‘I asked him if he had seen the sign saying no camping and no dogs and he said he hadn’t.

‘I then asked him did he see the sign about the protected birds and again he said no. He was being genuine.’

Ms Ward said better signage and community education is all-important, with the issues going beyond locally threatened species.

She pointed out that the South Ballina Beaches are identified as ‘highly vulnerable’ on the SEPP Coastal Management 2018 Coastal Vulnerability Map for NSW, with the long-term shoreline recession, a rising sea level and the low, narrow dune barrier at Boundary Creek presenting a beach erosion hazard.

Megan Ward shows 4WD damage to the dunes. Photo David Lowe.

‘It is predicted that by 2050-2100 there will be no front dune left, greatly increasing the risk of sea water flooding during extreme erosion events,’ said Ms Ward.

‘This logically indicates if you live in areas adjoining Boundary Creek such as East Wardell and Broadwater your property, home and livelihood may be threatened due to flooding.

‘And this is not just isolated to these areas, it also affects the local beaches from Lennox Head to Evans Head and further afield.’

Crown Lands must act

Megan Ward on South Ballina beach. Photo David Lowe.

Ms Ward said Crown Lands holds jurisdiction for South Ballina Beach but have never managed it. She said Crown Lands have told her they will have another land managers meeting in the next few weeks.

‘My concern is they still don’t fully recognise the destruction of what is happening and the meeting will be a compromise to meet everyone’s perceived individual wants and desires, not about what the beaches need.’

She said the NSW government is being hypocritical in that the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage has recognised the pied oystercatcher as a threatened species but is not being protected from the first action on its conservation management plan: ‘Disturbance from Recreational Use.’

Ms Ward argues that Crown Lands must close off South Ballina Beach to public 4WDs while a comprehensive ecological study is undertaken.

Other developments

Broadwater National Park 4WD damage. Photo Coastal Defenders Network.

Broadwater National Park 4WD damage. Photo Coastal Defenders Network.

At Broadwater National Park, the Coastal Defenders Network say there has been a ‘running battle’ between 4WDs and National Parks staff in recent weeks with dune driving tracks being closed with earthmoving equipment and then illegally reopened.

Stephen Totterman from CDN said this week there were convoys of 4WDs trying to get through the coffee rocks between South Ballina and Airforce beaches and at least two drove up the big dune.

‘Years of experience shows that the efforts to manage 4WDs at Broadwater NP (including Salty Lagoon and the Airforce Beach section) have not been effective. Therefore, the entire beach should be closed to public 4WDs,’ he said.

‘Richmond Valley Council is making a futile attempt to manage the situation with frequent enforcement patrols on Airforce Beach (but rarely north of the coffee rocks, which are often impassable). It’s time for the NPWS to support closing the beach.’

In other southern beaches news, Mr Totterham said the proposed Ringtank development (near the Surfing Cowboys site) was withdrawn this week, following strong objections from Rous County Council, but the threat from further ecologically destructive dunetop development in the area remains.

Action needed

Local resident Megan Ward on South Ballina Beach. Photo David Lowe.

Megan Ward said that while the future of the South Ballina beaches look grim if things don’t change, nothing in nature is static.

‘COVID-19 showed us that when 4WDs were removed from the beaches the dunes began to replenish themselves.’

‘The NSW state government and Crown Lands are well aware of the risks from ongoing 4WD traffic on the dunes and beaches,’ she continued.

‘The question is why aren’t they doing anything to address these risks? Inaction is not acceptable.’

If you would like to be involved in protecting South Ballina beach, you can email Megan Ward at [email protected] or follow the campaign on Facebook.


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5 responses to “Southern beaches saga continues”

  1. bazza says:

    4wders are an endangered species and should be protected

  2. Well good luck Steve and Megan getting National Parks to do anything that resemble either commonsense actions supporting conservation, or enforcing their own regulations like used to happen in Bruns, where the endangered shorebirds and littoral rainforest actually flourished for a few short years!!

    Now they can’t even manage to bait foxes regularly in areas that are declared Fox TAP sites containing breeding Critically Endangered Beach Stone-Curlews and Pied Oystercatchers!
    National Parks seem to have abandoned both conservation and enforcement in recent times in favour of unnecessary and rampant development of their own in Nightcap and Mt Jerusalem, so unwanted visitors, foxes, cats, pet dogs, trail bikes, phytophthora, myrtle rust and chytrid fungus have easy unfettered access to every place that is still important for threatened species, and that was formerly protected by their remoteness and lack of access.

  3. Room for all says:

    I’m all for conservation, though council should allow 4wds have a part of the beach that they are restricted to 1 or 2 km’s isn’t alot of area in this long stretch of beach. If they lock the whole beach up, people will still make illegal tracks anyway, more than likely in higher sensitive areas. It’s a very long beach, surely there’s room for all.

  4. Crown land manager. says:

    Hi. I’m a crown land endangered ecological community reserve manager on the north coast.
    A concerned group of local residents saw a problem of the crown land I now manage not being managed well for the future so we got together as a group and approached the crown lands dept and asked if we could take on the management. Crown lands we’re happy for our group to take over.
    We were given start up funding then had an ecologist draw up a plan of management and a restoration plan. We apply through lands dept funding scheme each year for regeneration and have always been successful with our applications. With the funding we employ professionals to do the regen and infrastructure work.
    As required by lands dept we have group work bees 5 to six times a year on a Saturday morning and a few meetings now over the last ten years we have a healthy reserve .
    I understand that the beach’s south of Balina is a very large area but a few Land management groups could be formed from communities along the areas and perhaps work together also.
    It all sounds a lot but really isn’t a Hugh work load and it gives back the area to the locals to manage.
    Groups can be formed with adds in the local paper or letter box drops in targeted areas.
    Crown lands have all the instructions and rules of how to manage groups in place and are very helpfull.
    It’s all worth looking into and can be very rewarding.
    Crown lands have websites for contact info.
    Good luck with it all.

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