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Byron Shire
October 4, 2022

More Blacks, More Dogs, More Irish 

Latest News

‘Sad and distressing’: massive numbers of bird deaths in Australian heatwaves reveal a profound loss is looming

Heatwaves linked to climate change have already led to mass deaths of birds and other wildlife around the world. To stem the loss of biodiversity as the climate warms, we need to better understand how birds respond.

Other News

What drainage works can residents expect?

With a third La Niña now underway, The Echo asked Council’s Director Infrastructure Services, Phil Holloway, what flood-affected residents can expect regarding drainage maintenance.

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: War on Trauma

In the War on Trauma we care for hurt people. We understand the importance of safety, of nutrition, of connection to community, of addressing loneliness, of the power of being in nature.  Being locked in jail for drug-related offences doesn’t change the underlying reasons for why someone has addiction issues. It just amplifies the trauma. And amplified trauma leads to drug harm.

Businesses launch campaign against holiday let policy

Businesses who say they would be adversely impacted by Council’s proposal to cap holiday letting to 90 days have gone on the offensive by launching a PR campaign.

Labor leader promises to stop Murwillumbah mega-school merger if they win election

NSW Labor leader Chris Minns has promised concerned parents, teachers, and the community that if Labor win the next election they will not follow through with the mega-school merger that is currently underway in Murwillumbah.

The Tweed Artisan Food Festival is almost here

The sixth Tweed Artisan Food Festival will be held at the end of the month – the festival runs for 10 days with 20 curated events showcasing the people, the place and the produce of the Tweed.

Acid sulfate soil run off impacting health of fish and Tweed River

Acid sulfate soil (ASS)-related runoff from floodplain drains is affecting water quality and the health of fish in the Tweed River and Tweed Shire Council (TSC) are seeking to assist landholders with improving water quality projects. 

Aine is on 28 August, from 5pm at Byron Theatre.

Having lived in so-called ‘Australia’ for a decade, Irish born singer-songwriter, Áine Tyrrell, rewrites what is imaginable every step of the way. She has carved a unique musical path, melding her own Irish roots from the ancient limestone rocks of Country Clare with her respect of the red dirt roads of 60,000 years of Indigenous culture in Australia. 

With, More Blacks, More Dogs, More Irish, Tyrrell decolonises the stories we’ve inherited and enables us to start thinking about what stories have been hidden in order for us to forget the truth of who we are and where we are.

Through a mix of visuals, song and storytelling, Áine brings these hidden Irish narratives to the forefront, weaving together a mix of modern and traditional stories to show the evolving Irish cultural landscape and what it means to be Irish, a woman, and on stolen land.

The show includes a panel discussion with Bunyarra Culture Collective, celebrating the parallels of culture, tradition and place, and the inter-woven history between Irish and First Nations People.

See this show 28 August, from 5pm at  Byron Theatre. 


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2 COMMENTS

  1. If only we could give back so called ‘Eire’ to it’s first nations people. Unfortunately your Celtic ancestors invaded and wiped them out. I see animals conquering each others territory in the forest. Even bacteria fight of territorial dominance. More access to resources means more offspring. 99.9999% of all species have gone extinct, this is how nature does that. None of us like to think about that for the same reason we don’t like to think how that steak got on our plate.

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Chris Minns visits Kingscliff to look at floodplain development risks

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