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Victims of Falls Festival crush come forward

Lorne Falls Festival stampede victim 'Maddy' said she still doesn't have white in her eyes 'it's just blood' after she was trampled on. Photo: Triple J Hack

Lorne Falls Festival stampede victim ‘Maddy’ said she still doesn’t have white in her eyes ‘it’s just blood’ after she was trampled on. Photo: Triple J Hack

The law firm leading a class action law suit against Falls Festival organisers over the Lorne crowd stampede on December 30 claims many victims have responded to the call.

Maddens Lawyers from Warrnambool last week urged people affected by the incident to be part of the class action, and some victims came forward with graphic photos of their injuries caused by the crush.

The stampede happened as people moved between two stage areas where headline acts were playing or had finished.

At the recent Byron Falls festival held at Yelgun, organisers had improved the access to its main amphitheatre stage by making it one-way to avoid crushes at peak times.

Class action principal Brendan Pendergast said at least 40 people, many from south-western Victoria, had come forward and thus the law firm was likely to pursue the class action.

Mr Pendergast told the ABC that those who had been in contact had suffered broken bones or suffered psychological trauma.

In response, the festival’s organisers said they were still trying to contact everyone involved in the stampede.

Around 80 people were caught up in the crush and 19 people hospitalised as a result.

Mr Pendergast said it appeared from initial reports that the crush could have been avoided if the site was designed better.

WorkSafe Victoria is conducting an investigation into the incident that will look specifically at whether the festival broke rules and regulations around site design and safety procedures.

That probe is expected to be completed in around six months.

Co-producer of the festival, Jessica Ducrou, said after the incident that a ‘confluence of events’ led to the crush, and that patron safety was of paramount importance to organisers.

 


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