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Byron Shire
April 20, 2021

Community rallies for Mike Jordan’s family

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Mike Jordan. Photo supplied.

The retirement plans of Mike and Donna Jordan were cut short last October, when Mike was diagnosed with lung cancer.

The couple had great plans for their retirement. Mike was a master builder and he was building two small cabins on their property to generate an income for the family.

During his illness, Mike fast-tracked the cabins project to see it through; however, this wasn’t to be. Mike was a diligent hands-on builder who saw his projects through with attention to detail and quality.

Sadly, he never saw his own project through. Soon after he was diagnosed, the cancer spread to his spine and  finances were restricted owing to his inability to work the last few months of his life. The project remains unfinished.

In March this year, at just 45 years of age, Mike, who was a non-smoker and a fit and strong individual, died as a result of his illness.

Mike’s wife Donna says that Mike loved his rugby and his family – not necessarily in that order – ‘When Mike found out he had cancer he used to say “It Is What It Is”.’

Family friend Brad Turk is organising a fundraising benefit for Donna and their two kids Heath and Teal, to get the cabins finished and provide the income Mike so dearly wanted to provide for his family.

The ‘It Is What It Is’ Mike Jordan benefit night will feature the bands Skegss, Miniskirt, and Bunny Racket, all of whom are playing for free.

The aim of the organisers for this event with is to get enough money to get the cabins over the line, for Mike, and his family.

Benefit night July 26

Mike and his family’s benefit night will be held at the Bangalow Bowlo on Friday July 26. Tickets can be purchased at OzTix by searching ‘It is what it is’.


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1 COMMENT

  1. One very fortunate family to own where they live, and have community help in her time of sorrow.
    Blessed to have the support, many families go through much worse without any help from their community.
    Thankyou Brad Turk in helping this family

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