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April 13, 2021

Eat the problem

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Acclaimed Byron restaurant Harvest Newrybar is partnering with Mona on Wednesday 7 August to create imaginative solutions to the problem of invasive species: eating them.

Part of Eat the Problem is Mona’s genre-defying exploration of transforming flaw into feature using invasive species in food and art. This special dinner event will feature Harvest’s own unique interpretation of the theme.

Conceived by artist and curator Kirsha Kaechele, the Eat the Problem book and exhibition celebrates the abundance of pests, such as sea urchin, rabbit, cane toad, or deer, and the art of solving multiple problems at once.

Kirsha Kaechele says: ‘Food is such a central part of the Mona experience; it is one of the media through which we can create and share art, and definitely the most interactive. I’m very excited to bring Eat the Problem to the mainland and to work with the amazing team at Harvest. They are up for the challenge of transforming pest into delicacy and I can’t wait to taste what they create. Diners will experience a true feast for the senses, and at the same time deepen their appreciation for systems-based sustainable thinking, in a delightful and delicious unfolding of an evening.’

Alastair Waddell says: ‘Kirsha’s approach to eating the problem is a great inspiration for everyone fascinated by food, nature, and edible solutions. I look forward to exploring the Northern Rivers with Vince and Kirsha, and collaborating on a creative and curious series of dishes.’

Harvest Newrybar. Five-course menu with optional matched wines, 7 August. Ph 6687 2644 or
[email protected]


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Inspector condemns prisoner health services

In the forward to the Inspector of Custodial Services Report published last month, Fiona Rafter Inspector of Custodial Services says that the provision of health services to inmates in New South Wales custodial facilities is a complex and challenging responsibility.

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Brother and sister clothing designers Camilla Freeman-Topper and Marc Freeman are, were 11 and 13 respectively when their mother died of ovarian cancer.

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