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Byron Shire
February 4, 2023

Sustainability

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Swivel by name, drivel by nature

The lack of authenticity of Byron Councillor, Mark Swivel, does not come as a surprise from this side of...

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Vale Professor Will Steffen – leading climate scientist

Leading climate scientist Professor Will Steffen has died of pancreatic cancer in Canberra at 75.

We’ve had the rain bomb, is a fire bomb next?

We had the Black Summer fires and then the floods and NSW Farmers says time is running out to prevent more mass bushfires at the end of this year.

Looking forward, looking back with Jeff Johnson

Long term independent Ballina Shire Councillor Jeff Johnson reflects on the challenges of the past year, and his priorities for 2023.

60 farmers blockaded Santos trucks and oppose CSG

More than 60 farmers blockaded Santos trucks on Saturday and police were called to a state forest near Gunnedah amid disputes over potential water extraction and fracking.

Elanora woman murdered – police seek sightings of Ford Laser

Detectives investigating the murder of 61-year-old Wendy Sleeman are appealing to anyone who may have seen or captured vision...

Only nine weeks to Bluesfest and 18 new artists announced

Easter is on its way and that means Bluesfest is only nine weeks away. 

David Gilet, Byron Bay

In regard to sustainable villages – I recently watched a documentary on giraffes in the country of Niger. The people, their domestic animals, and giraffes all seemed to coexist pretty successfully. There was footage of giraffes and people within metres of each other, basically ignoring each other. But there were problems. First the giraffes were driven away from the waterholes in the dry season to allow cattle to drink, which meant the giraffes only had access at night. Second, although it was against the law to cut acacias, the giraffes’ main food source, the people were too poor to be able to obey it. Third, the giraffes ate their bean crop.

It occurred to me how a renewable energy power source would transform these people’s lives. Electricity could be used for cooking, lighting, and refrigeration. It could also power pumps, small workshops, and electric fences to protect the bean crops. If such a system were applied throughout the Third World, maybe along the lines of the Bangladeshi small loans scheme, the world could be transformed.

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