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Bamboo’s many benefits include supporting youth

Saturday’s Byron Youth Service fundraiser at Byron Bay Bamboo in Myocum attracted hundreds who enjoyed displays by artisans, horticulturists and even ‘bio-charists’. Pictured is property owner Kaye Wood with Lance Seadon, who created the boat. Photo Jeff Dawson

Saturday’s Byron Youth Service fundraiser at Byron Bay Bamboo in Myocum attracted hundreds who enjoyed displays by artisans, horticulturists and even ‘bio-charists’. Pictured is property owner Kaye Wood with Lance Seadon, who created the boat. Photo Jeff Dawson

Last Saturday, Myocum business Byron Bamboo held a benefit for Byron Youth Service to show off the diverse benefits of the fast-growing plant.

It was the first time owner Kaye Wood’s property, which boasts hundreds of varieties of bamboos, gingers and heliconias, has held an open day.

From the decorative, to the edible, to serious construction, workshops showed the benefits of growing and working with bamboo in our area.

One popular workshop showed how bamboo offcuts can be used to create biochar for soil fertilisation.

Another bamboo pioneer demonstrated how steaming can be used as a non-toxic way of treating bamboo, which is essential if it’s being used for building.

Bamboo’s unique properties as a construction material were shown off in the shape of this remarkable boat, built by Lance Seaton.


2 responses to “Bamboo’s many benefits include supporting youth”

  1. Ken says:

    As an environmental scientist, with the interest of the ecology and rainforests in particular at heart , I can only advise that NO_ONE plant this noxious plant on the Northern Rivers!
    Bamboo is the most virulent of all the dreadful grass species ignorantly unleashed in this area, with no native predators to control them. These things make Camphor Laurel look benign in contrast.
    G”)

  2. Carole Gamble says:

    Oh dear Ken!!
    You are absolutely right about RUNNING BAMBOOS but I am 100% sure that this bamboo nursery would not grow, propagate or sell these species but there are dozens of CLUMPING BAMBOOS that are not only suitable but non invasive and bamboo is a unique and under used SUSTAINABLE timber so back to you horticulture books please!

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