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Byron Shire
October 3, 2022
Home Articles & Columns Science Goes Viral

Science Goes Viral

‘Sad and distressing’: massive numbers of bird deaths in Australian heatwaves reveal a profound loss is looming

Heatwaves linked to climate change have already led to mass deaths of birds and other wildlife around the world. To stem the loss of biodiversity as the climate warms, we need to better understand how birds respond.

Chemicals left by first stars in the universe may have been detected by the Gemini North telescope

The chemical remains of the earliest stars in the universe may have been discovered by astronomers.

Mangroves keep carbon in the soil for 5,000 years

Marine forests are great long-term carbon sinks. In fact, according to new research on a Mexican mangrove forest, they can keep carbon out of the atmosphere for millennia.

Urban trees and forests are very vulnerable to climate change: how should we shore them up?

New research predicts most of our favourite city trees are at risk from global warming.

31,000-year-old skeleton found in famous Borneo rock art caves shows earliest evidence of amputation surgery

Evidence of what is believed to be the earliest known amputation in human history has been found by a team of Australian and Indonesian archaeologists in Borneo.

Honouring forgotten women scientists, mathematicians, programmers and palaeontologists

Countering ‘The Matilda Effect’ of women’s work overlooked for recognition and awards. Brought to you by Cosmos Magazine and The Echo In the case of German astronomer Maria Kirch...

Queen Elizabeth – the science lover born in the technology age

Born April 1926, the late Queen Elizabeth II experienced a life and reign of huge technological, social, and scientific advancement. She was not shy of technology or science.

West Antarctic glacier beats a hasty retreat, alarming scientists

New seafloor imaging shows Thwaites Glacier has experienced blistering bursts of retreat.

The review on women in STEM: a physicist’s perspective

We have a long road ahead to address the gender imbalance in the workforce.

Scans of tiny 13.5-million-year-old Aussie crocodile suggest it may have spent most of its time on land

A tiny crocodile which called north-western Queensland home 13.5 million years ago has revealed its secrets to University of Queensland researchers.

Australia’s Black Summer bushfires linked to largest stratospheric warming in three decades

More evidence that the smoke from the fires may have prolonged the life of the hole in the ozone layer.

Study suggests Gen Z with Down syndrome have embraced new tech in lives full of meaning and purpose

More research has come from a long running project in Queensland that reinforces the high quality of life people with Down syndrome are experiencing and can help block misinformation given to prospective parents.

Half a year of dangerous heat beckons for parts of Australia in 1.8-degree warmer world

Scientists are learning what global warming will mean for daily temperatures across the world and what adaptation and mitigation will be required to protect people from dangerous heat.

The staggering natural price tag of the Black Summer bushfires

Cosmos Magazine and The Echo Carbon sequestration will offset a fraction – but only a fraction. Researchers and conservationists have estimated the total cost of restoring Australia’s native...

On the brink: studies showing Antarctica’s climate risks

Understanding ice loss in Antarctica has been improved by a range of research into causes of ice shelves and glacier retreat on the frozen continent.

Curved-space robot defies known laws of physics, heralding new locomotive technology possibilities

A robot engineered at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) has done the unthinkable and flouted a steadfast law of motion, suggesting that new laws need to be defined.

The COVID-19 Booster: Latest news from the pandemic

The COVID-19 Booster is Cosmos Magazine’s weekly shot of the latest research, news and data from the pandemic.

Neanderthal vs. modern humans: Slow and steady wins the brain game

Our closest human relatives are Neanderthals and their Asian relatives the Denisovans. The differences between Homo sapiens and these other groups are encoded in changes to the amino acids which are the building blocks of proteins in our cells and tissues.

Explainer: Is Australia’s coal more greenhouse gas friendly than other coal?

Everything you wanted to know about coal but were too afraid to ask.

New report sheds more light on the controversial origins of COVID-19

Brought to you by Cosmos Magazine and The Echo The Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan was the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic. The journal Science has reopened the...

As Europe burns, Australia needs to ‘prepare for 50°C’ say experts

Brought to you by Cosmos Magazine and The Echo Climate change is driving temperature records in northern hemisphere, and that’s a warning sign down under. The UK’s hottest day...

Cataloguing destruction: the climate and biodiversity crises are happening now, and the effects are measurable

If the past five years has felt like a series of rolling crises, the State of the Environment report released on 19 July affirms that view in over 200 pages of documented decline in Australia’s climate, ecosystems, and biodiversity.

How to get out of the energy crisis, according to top technology experts

Low-emissions technology and renewable energy are the way out of the current energy crisis, according to the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering.

Not all masks are created equal, but they’re better than nothing against BA.4 and BA.5

As Australia’s health authorities and governments debate public health mandates in response to a surge in COVID-19 infections, experts are instead pushing for improvements in public information and awareness.

How feasible are EVs for remote Australia, really?

It’s often assumed that electric vehicles (EVs) aren’t practical in regional Australia – the distances are too big. But a new analysis casts doubt on this.

Why are we building on floodplains?

Parts of New South Wales are being inundated for the third time in four months as yet more record-breaking rain causes flooding to Sydney and beyond. Add to this the March 2021 floods and it’s the fourth time in two years that some people have watched parts of their homes go under water.

Australia to light the way with industrial-scale power

Big ideas are easy. Finding the big money and big names to back them is not. But a long-term plan to turn WA’s Pilbara into the largest renewable energy hub in the world has just taken a giant leap forward.

Very wet and very dry: unprecedented droughts and hyper-damaging floods in the future

The world will be pushed to more weather extremes in coming decades, according to two studies which carry stark warnings of floods and droughts, respectively.

You may have missed… mangroves’ carbon storage potential, smart implants, and twitter misinformation

Mangrove forests are massive carbon sinks, capable of storing over 1,000 tonnes of carbon per hectare.

Women scientists are less likely to be credited for their work

Gender gap in publication and patent authorship suggests women’s contributions to science are ignored or unappreciated.

Renewable energy certificates might not be honest about their renewable energy

Buying emissions drops isn’t as effective as reducing your emissions.

Fantastic giant tortoise, thought to be extinct in 1906, confirmed alive on a Galápagos island

Researchers suspected that Fernanda might be a fantastic giant tortoise, or Chelonoidis phantasticus, a species believed to have gone extinct in 1906.

Ngalurrtju partnership to protect more than 300,000 hectares in Central Australia

Brought to you by Cosmos Magazine and The Echo Innovative partnership between Traditional Owners and the Australian Wildlife Conservancy will help restore biodiversity and mitigate climate change. More than...

No link found between caesarean birth and food allergies

While babies born through caesareans may lack some gut bacteria that would otherwise be gained through vaginal births, recent research has consistently shown that there is little evidence for caesarean births being responsible for asthma and allergies.

Coal fired. How are the major parties planning for its end?

There’s very little economic future for fossil fuels, even if you ignore the environmental effects. Renewable energy is cheaper, including battery storage.

Releasing the chokehold on Australia’s water

What the trading of 40 gigalitres of water from the Barmah Choke means for the Murray Darling Basin.

Earthly comparison hints at shallow liquid water on Jupiter’s moon

Researchers have revealed new insight into the geology of Jupiter’s moon Europa, described by NASA as one of the most promising locations in our solar system for present-day extraterrestrial life.

A better understanding of severe COVID-19 in children

Most children who catch COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms of infection. But a small percentage with the virus may still have to go to hospital. So far, 13 Australians under the age of 19 have died from COVID.

Sandy the pure desert dingo

International collaboration of researchers sequence the genome of the pure desert dingo.

‘Sad and distressing’: massive numbers of bird deaths in Australian heatwaves reveal a profound loss is looming

Heatwaves linked to climate change have already led to mass deaths of birds and other wildlife around the world. To stem the loss of biodiversity as the climate warms, we need to better understand how birds respond.

CWA push for improved maternity services

The W in CWA stands for Women and the CWA have been standing up for women yet again during their recent webinar and annual Awareness Week campaign.

Chris Minns visits Kingscliff to look at floodplain development risks

The potential future risks and costs of flooding to the community and government if approved, but yet to be built, housing is allowed to go ahead in floodplains was under the spotlight last week in Kingscliff.

The Tweed Artisan Food Festival is almost here

The sixth Tweed Artisan Food Festival will be held at the end of the month – the festival runs for 10 days with 20 curated events showcasing the people, the place and the produce of the Tweed.