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Uncle Bob promotes ‘unconditional love’ in Mullum

Uluru caretaker and Yankunytjatjara elder Uncle Bob will appear at an Indigenous educational fundraiser on July 24 at the Mullumbimby Civic Hall. Photo Jeff Dawson

Uluru caretaker and Yankunytjatjara elder Uncle Bob will appear at an Indigenous educational fundraiser on July 24 at the Mullumbimby Civic Hall. Photo Jeff Dawson

A traditional caretaker of Uluru/Kata Tjuta will be sharing his wisdom, stories and songs at an Indigenous educational fundraiser on July 24 at the Mullumbimby Civic Hall.

It’s a rare chance to hear elder Uncle Bob Randall first-hand – as a child, like many from the stolen generations, he was taken from his family by a police officer.

Along with others, he walked through the desert as an eight-year-old with his neck chains while a police officer rode beside them on camel.

Co-organiser of the event, Qala Phoenix, says that after returning to his land, his people and family heritage, Uncle Bob became a special teaching uncle, or a ‘Tjilpi’ of the Yankunytjatjara people.

‘Now in his mid 80s,’ says Phoenix, ‘he is one of the last of his lineage to be born in the traditional way of his ancestors.’ Through his music, films, and books about the stolen generations, he became a prolific educator, and has travelled the world to speak at events.

Phoenix says Uncle Bob’s message is ‘promoting unconditional love and the art of living in the ancient way of life of his ancestors, in Kanyini.’

‘Kanyini is the practice of living in unconditional love with responsibility of caring for all of life, the Earth, self and each other.’

An evening with Uncle Bob Randall and didgeridoo sound healing will be held Thursday July 24 from 6 to 9pm at the Mullumbimby Civic Hall. Bring a blanket/pillow – hot food and chai will be available.


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