19.3 C
Byron Shire
August 18, 2022

Women Like Ellen Briggs

Latest News

Food, drink and craft brewery ’in principle’ approval for Tweed South Industrial Estate

Industrial estate zoning was under question at Tweed Council's planning meeting on 4 August as councillors endorsed the development application (DA) for an ‘artisan food and drink industry including craft brewery, retail area and restaurant at Industry Drive Tweed Heads South. 

Other News

A long and chequered career in cooking

When she was just 16, Elizabeth Jackson was kicked out of a home economics class – not because she burnt a pot or had a collapsed sponge, but because she made a black wedding cake.

Undesirable

​​An undeniable purpose in living is enjoyment, due to the fact that we have the capability to enjoy. What...

Power of the people

Katherine (Letters, 3 August) asked ‘can the power of the people compete...’? The answer is in the recent federal election:...

NSW bans public display of Nazi symbol

In an historic moment a new law making it a criminal offence to knowingly display a Nazi symbol in public without a reasonable excuse, has passed NSW Parliament yesterday.

Ecocide in Mullum

Saddened by the huge trauma that homeless flood victims are undergoing, those feelings were further compounded by reading Hans...

Fuel stolen from farmer

The cost of fuel continues to be a major consideration in the budget, particularly in country areas where distances travelled are inevitably further for your average daily needs like accessing shops, schools and other activities.

women like mandy and ellenWould you believe that two of Australia’s funniest women comedians live in Mullumbimby? In fact Ellen Briggs was Mandy Nolan’s star comedy student at her adult-education class almost a decade ago, and now, with thousands of gigs under their collective belt, these two women thought it was time to team up. It’s Prude versus Rude!

Ellen, your show is called Women LIke Us. What kind of women is that exactly?

Women who are ‘girls’ girls’. Women who can laugh at themselves and how ridiculous we can be. Women that make mistakes and get back up and dust themselves off, re-apply their lippy, have a bitch about how that was someone else’s fault, and that no-one else in the house ever does anything, pick up some groceries, make some school lunches, and just bloody get on with it. You know. That type of woman.

Describe Mandy in five words. 

Hilarious, fearless, generous, admirable, dangerous (that last one refers to her driving).

The show has been touted as PRUDE v RUDE. How do you think the combination of your different comedic styles works together?

While we both cover similar topics, our styles are so different. I really am a bit of prude to be honest, and I’m incredibly old-fashioned, whereas Mandy has this wonderful ability of pushing the envelope so far that there really is no turning back. I love to tell a story, and weave my way in and out of it, and it must have a beginning and ending for me. Mandy might start one thing, and next thing you know, she has you by the hand and you’re running with her head on into something completely different. It’s a really great mix of styles.

What are the challenges of being a regional comedian?

The amount of time I spend in the car. Most work is at least an hour away, often two, to do a 40-minute show. It’s exhausting doing all that driving, but I think the regionality is what makes us interesting. Just living where we live is interesting. I wouldn’t have half my material if I lived on the Gold Coast!

What about being a woman on the circuit. Do you notice any inherent sexisms along the way?

If I have to travel away overnight for work, I always get asked, ‘What are you doing with the kids?’ My husband is away nine months of the year and I guarantee he has never been asked that question. Some of the intros that I get are pretty off. Like, ‘Wow, you’re in for a treat. Our next comedian is a woman!’ Like they wouldn’t have noticed that I was a woman. Or, ‘This chick has a pretty nice set’. Hilarious, huh? Some people have said I only get some of the gigs I get because I am a woman. I’m not sure how that works because there are actually promoters who have admitted that they don’t like headlining women because they worry people won’t turn up. People have a perception that all we are going to talk about is periods, vaginas, and beat up on men. It’s actually completely the opposite. I don’t even think I have a vagina joke!

What are the daily issues that rock your boat?

I have an ongoing battle with a local farmer that gets me going most days! I think we’re at the point of his thinking I am completely unstable, and that’s what I was aiming for. I am often exhausted from work and then getting up and getting kids off to school and doing the daily stuff as well. Working nights doesn’t work well with daytime chores. I have an elderly mother who is now alone and needs care. The middle-aged years should be called The Looking After Everyone Else Years. Also critters. I have a lot of critters who have chosen to scare me on a daily basis.

Okay, it’s the dinner party question – if you could invite anyone…

Nelson Mandela – I would love to learn how to be as forgiving and gracious as he. I can hold a grudge like an elephant. All my girlfriends who live interstate – I miss them terribly on a daily basis. Joan Rivers would be interesting because of the path she forged for female comedians – she would have some great stories. The guy who plays the lead role in the TV show Kingdom, and John Mayer. For obvious reasons.

Your lifetime dream is to…

Get my kids grown up safe and sound and out in the world as functioning human beings then have as many animals as I’d like on my farm without my husband complaining about it. One of everything. Like Noah, but halved.

If you could improve the world by changing just one thing, what would it be?

I’d make cellulite sexy.

What should we expect for your show at Star Court Theatre?

You can expect two hours of hilarious comedy that will have you laughing so hard your sides will hurt. In fact at our last show someone laughed so hard she vomited. So maybe you can expect to vomit too.

Ellen Briggs and Mandy Nolan join forces for Women Like Us at the Star Court Theatre in Lismore on Saturday 20 June.

Ph 6622 5005 or book via starcourttheatre.com.au. Tickets are $27.20 or $22.20 concession.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Storylines – The Voice of the voiceless

My grandfather would often tell me a story. A story about a community. This community was self-sufficient, self-reliant, and self-determining of their own lives.

Draft COMP caps Public Access at Lismore Council

A Draft Code of Meeting Practice (COMP) and Briefing Policy prepared by the Governance & Customer Service Manager was the subject of discussion at Lismore Council this week.

Olivia Newton-John and FernGully

Olivia Newton-John was active in many environmental issues in the Northern Rivers region. One in particular was the 12-year battle to save ‘Fern Gully’ in Coorabell from being dammed.

Planning Dept investigates Splendour festival site

The company which owns and manages North Byron Parklands is being investigated by the NSW Department of Planning over traffic safety breaches that occurred during last month’s Splendour in the Grass festival.