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October 8, 2022

Tweed-Byron the state’s most dangerous place to drive

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A driver hauling this large excavator on the back of this truck has been charged with mid-range drink-driving and driving unlicensed . Photo NSW Police
A driver hauling this large excavator on the back of this truck has been charged with mid-range drink-driving and driving unlicensed . Photo NSW Police

Tweed/Byron police charged 19 drink-drivers over the weekend with another 86 drivers testing positive to drugs.

The three day operation saw the region retain its unwanted crown as the state’s most dangerous place to drive.

One truck driver, who was hauling a large excavator at the time, was charged with mid-range drink-driving and driving unlicensed during the operation.

Traffic and highway patrol command assistant commissioner Michael Corboy described the results as ‘staggering, considering the high road toll.’

‘Despite the death toll on our roads, which now sits at 357, and the numerous warnings about drink and drug-driving, I am dumbfounded by how many drivers we have caught impaired during the operation,’ he said.

‘The Tweed/Byron Local Area Command is ranked number one in the state for alcohol related crashes, and there is an average of seven fatal crashes in the command every year.

Disgrace

‘This is not a statistic to be proud of. It is a disgrace,’ assistant commissioner Corboy said.

Operation Mega Drive 2 started on Thursday December 1 and finished on Saturday December 3.

The operation primarily focused on drink and drug-drivers in the region but speeding, mobile phone use and not wearing seatbelts were also targeted.

During the operation, officers conducted 2,599 random breath tests, with 19 drivers charged with drink driving, and conducted 425 random drug tests, with 86 drivers testing positive.

Officers also issues 101 fines for speeding, 29 for not wearing a seatbelt, 300 other infringements, and a total of 30 charges were laid.

A heavy vehicle driver was charged with mid-range drink-driving and driving unlicensed after his truck – which was carrying a large excavator – was pulled over on the M1 at Chinaderah on Thursday.

The 49-year-old Queensland man was charged after returning an alleged reading of 0.131 and checks revealed he did not have a licence required for the heavy vehicle.

He is due to face Tweed Heads Local Court on January 9, 2017.

 

 


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2 COMMENTS

  1. Just to clarify, when Traffic and Highway Patrol Command Assistant Commissioner Michael Corboy said “I am dumbfounded by how many drivers we have caught impaired during the operation”, he cannot be referring to drivers detected with cannabis in their saliva.
    The NSW government has never done a test for cannabis impairment and has no idea what if any quantity of cannabis would cause impairment.
    When this was pointed out to them they simply made a new law to get around this inconvenient fact.
    The charge now is “Drive with the presence of cannabis in oral fluid, blood or urine”.
    This is a particularly immoral charge since non-active metabolites of cannabis can be detected long after any affect has worn off.
    Rather like convicting a drinker for having a glass of wine last week.
    RJStark

    • Richard While the NSW government may not have done testing for impairment clinical testing shows impairment of skills relating to driving. As such it cannot be said the NSW government has no idea of the quantity that impairs. Even if you doubt the science relating to cannabis induced skills impairment Corboy would be technically correct as it also covered drink driving, but regardless it is disappointing that you would want to undermine the police in their work, and do not focus on the main point of the article, which is the high road toll. In Canberra where I write this, there is a strong culture of not driving under the influence, which extends to my kids generation fostered by zero tolerance for P-platers, This like the many other effective public health campaigns that Australia is so good at has been supported by unequivocal message about not using drugs and driving – especially but not only alcohol, and is supported to by parents, schools, the police and the many young people who are concerned about their own and their friends safety . This has led to the practice of taking turns to be the “dessie” (designated driver), and is supported by late night and early morning buses around this time of year and the legalisation of Uber, all so people can party and socialize and get home safely That, a good road system, some separation of cyclists from cars, along with lower speed limits road for road than are usual in Australia, all keep the toll down, Lobby for better public transport in the Northern Rivers, Uber, better roads and cycle infrastructure, and lower speeds, while supporting the government and the police in presenting clear unequivocal messages that foster a culture that does not tolerate mixing legal and illegal drugs and driving.

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