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Byron Shire
January 26, 2022

Can you spare a mo(hawk) for charity?

Latest News

What does Australia Day mean?

Another Australia Day. Another divisive polemic about the date, the day, and its meaning. Those who seek to change the date argue that 26 January signifies the beginning of Britain’s invasion of Australia and the violent expropriation of Aboriginal lands.

Other News

NRAS about to kick off 2022 adoption days

Local animal charity Northern Rivers Animal Services has kicked off 2022 with a bang, with more cats, kittens and puppies needing homes in Ballina than you can shake a rescuer at.

More government support needed for nurses

What would it take to keep our nurses and paramedics from resigning en masse as the current crisis in the NSW health care system worsens?

Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning 26 January, 2022

There's still loads of stuff on in the Byron Shire and beyond

A new Mungo needed

A new Mungo is needed to investigate, report and comment, because the major media sure as hell ain’t! When is...

Far North Coast Comedy

Lots of comedy to laugh out loud at

Taxi stolen at knifepoint in Tweed Heads

An investigation is underway after a taxi driver had his cab stolen at knifepoint at Tweed Heads.

Byron-based author and adventurer Matt Towner his shaving his head into a mohawk for charity. Photo supplied

Local adventurer and author Matt Towner has found a sharp new way to raise funds for the Leukaemia Foundation and launch his latest book at the same time.

Matt’s 80-year-old mum is a long-term leukaemia survivor so he’s chosen to make the launch of his new book Crazy Shi*t in Asia a fundraiser for the charity.

But here’s the hook – he’s launching the book as part of The World’s Greatest Shave at The Blade barbers’ shop under La La Land in Byron Bay on Friday, March 16, from 5pm as he goes the Full Mo.

You can choose to join him at fundraise yourself, or donate to Matt’s fundraising page.

Matt, who is very lucky to be alive after a motorcycle accident in the middle of nowhere deep in the dark jungles of Thailand after smuggling gemstones all over the world for a living, has turned his taste for adventure into a series of books.

New Holland Publishers have commissioned the series and aim to have them in every airport bookshop globally as well as all good book stores and both books are available online already and selling very quickly now.

If you would like more of a taste of Matt’s crazy stores visit his Travellers Tales website.


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Man charged following pursuit – Far North Coast

A man has been charged with driving offences following a police pursuit in the state’s far north.

More government support needed for nurses

What would it take to keep our nurses and paramedics from resigning en masse as the current crisis in the NSW health care system worsens?

Storylines – Aboriginal Tent Embassy 1972–2022 – the power of patience

The Aboriginal Tent Embassy was established on the lawns opposite Old Parliament House on 26 January 1972. Four First Nations men sat beneath a beach umbrella protesting the government’s attitude towards Indigenous land rights.

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Listening to the truth tellers

A long time ago my husband had to attend a meeting in Redfern. He works in the health and academic sector and it was a consultation with some First Nations clinicians and community workers. He arrived a little earlier for the meeting to the centre – not your typical clinical setting but a regular house. On arrival he was greeted by an older woman who led him to a table and offered him a cup of tea. They chatted. Had a laugh. She offered him a biscuit.