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May 22, 2024

Plastic-free July sees clean-up of Byron beaches

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Local volunteers helped clean 15 litres of plastic rubbish from Apex Park on July 9. Photo supplied

The month is barely half-way done and already there have been two major clean-ups of plastic residue on Byron’s beaches.

The first event on July 9, hosted by North East Waste and local community group Positive Change for Marine Life featured a ‘Pick it up and Bin it’ clean-up in busy Apex Park.

In less than an hour the volunteers collected around 15 litres of mostly small plastic based items including more than 160 cigarette butts!

People often don’t realise cigarette butts are made of plastic.

North East Waste litter project coordinator Karen Rudkin said it was a very busy time at the popular foreshore park and the clean-up ‘really gave maximum exposure to the litter issue’. ‘We engaged locals and visitors alike in taking responsibility for litter, whether their own or littered by others, to help reduce the negative impact it has on our precious coastal environment’.

‘It’s Plastic Free July so the perfect time to make the switch from those single use plastic items and help put a stop to the damage that land based litter is causing to our ocean both here at home and across the world’ Karen said.

On Saturday (July 14) Positive Change for Marine turned their attention to Torakina Park Brunswick Heads.

They were joined by local group Mullum Cares, who are running their own Plastic Free July campaign ‘Bunting Love’ to encourage paper and fabric buntings as an alternative to balloons.

 

 


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