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COVID-19 latest updates – May 7

Latest News

Lighthouse Road

The section from the bus stop on Lighthouse Road to the divide of the road to Byron Bay, is...

Other News

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NPWS wants to remove beach nudity option

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Just what the doctor and nurses and midwives ordered

It seems like nurses and midwives are always struggling under the weight of poor patient-to-staff ratios. It is hoped that an influx of new workers could help ease the load. This will be a welcome relief for local staff.

‘Key workers’ removed from Ballina Council’s housing project as Mayor seeks full market rents

Essential workers were the losers at the recent Ballina Council meeting when councillors actively removed the category for ‘key workers’ from their development of rental housing on land it owns in Wollongbar.

An adventure of a different kind

Two years ago adventurer Emma Scattergood discovered that a journey doesn’t always involve travel. In 2022, Emma was told she had stage 3 invasive lobular breast cancer. 

With a constant stream of information and misinformation about COVID-19 (coronavirus) circulating, Echonetdaily will endeavour to update this page as news comes to hand.

UPDATED May 7, 7am

NSW Local Health District COVID-19 update

There are now 55 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in residents of the Northern NSW
Local Health District (NNSWLHD) as at 8pm, 5 May. This is a reduction of one, after
one case was excluded after further testing.

It has now been three weeks (21 days) since the last recorded case.

Of these 55 cases, 46 are now recovered.

One COVID-19 patient is being cared for in hospital, none in ICU.

NNSWLHD cases by likely source of infection

Expanded hours for Byron Central Hospital fever clinic
Due to high demand for testing at the Byron Central Hospital fever clinic, we have now extended the opening hours to be 9am to 5pm daily.
There is no need to make an appointment.

Anyone with flu-like symptoms, however mild, is encouraged to get tested for COVID-
19.

Other hospital-based testing clinics are located at The Tweed Hospital, Lismore Base
Hospital and Grafton Base Hospital.


Queensland has no new confirmed cases of COVID-19

Stats as at 6pm, May 6

HHS* Active cases Recovered cases Deaths Total confirmed
cases to date
Cairns and Hinterland 3 30 0 33
Central Queensland 0 8 0 8
Central West 0 0 0 0
Darling Downs 0 40 2 42
Gold Coast 10 184 0 194
Mackay 0 15 0 15
Metro North 18 294 3 315
Metro South 18 239 0 257
North West 0 0 0 0
South West 0 0 0 0
Sunshine Coast 2 91 1 94
Torres and Cape 0 0 0 0
Townsville 0 24 0 24
West Moreton 0 37 0 37
Wide Bay 1 23 0 24
Overseas 0 0 0 0
Total 52 985 6 1043**

** Changes may occur in the number of notifications reported from day to day. This is due to ongoing maintenance and update of notification details as new information becomes available, or where discrepancies are detected through data quality assurance activities.
* HHS level case data may include a patient’s residential address, Public Health Unit managing or location where test was ordered.

Queensland Health’s Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young reminded all Queenslanders to continue practising social distancing and good hygiene.

“You should only be socialising with members of your household or one other person when leaving your home, or you can have two visitors visit your home,” Dr Young said.

“While we have eased restrictions to allow Queenslanders to leave their homes for recreation within a 50km radius, if the place you plan to visit is crowded when you get there and you can’t easily exercise the 1.5 metre social distancing rule, then you should go to another location or visit at a less busy time.

“While Queensland has continued to record very low numbers of new cases over the past week, we cannot be complacent and it’s so important that we continue to exercise social distancing, good hygiene and comply with all the restrictions in place, as well as staying home if you’re unwell,” she said.

All travellers entering from overseas or if not an exempt person from interstate are reminded they must self-quarantine for 14 days to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

The self-quarantine duration of 14 days is based on advice from the World Health Organization (WHO), which currently estimates that the incubation period of COVID-19 ranges from one to 14 days, with a median incubation period of five to six days.

After you finish your quarantine period, make sure you continue to monitor your health closely.

If you begin to feel unwell, you must contact a doctor immediately.

Currently, 973 of the 1,043 confirmed cases had recently travelled overseas or had close contact with a confirmed case, such as their partner or flatmate.

A total of 120,204 tests for COVID-19 have been undertaken in Queensland, with 2,465 tests undertaken in the previous 24 hours.

Queensland’s testing criteria has been expanded so that anyone in the state who has a fever (or history of fever) or acute respiratory symptoms can get tested.

If you are unwell and you meet the above criteria, you should contact a doctor immediately. Your doctor will decide if you need to be tested for COVID-19.

Before your appointment, please call ahead and tell them about your symptoms so they can prepare for your visit.

Most Queenslanders who have contracted COVID-19 have experienced mild symptoms. Currently, nine of the 52 active confirmed cases are in hospital, with four of these in intensive care. The remainder of active cases are currently recovering at home.

A total of 985 Queenslanders (94 per cent of total cases) have now recovered from COVID-19.

Contact tracing continues for recent cases. Queensland Health will notify the community if any public health alerts are required.

We want everyone to continue playing their part to protect themselves and the more vulnerable in our community. Please continue to follow the recommended advice from us and our federal counterparts in regards to social distancing, public gatherings and general wellbeing.

Critically, make sure you are practising good hygiene and staying home, especially if you’re sick. Washing your hands properly and often is the gold standard of health advice that can help prevent viruses from entering your body.

The most up-to-date reliable information is available on the Queensland Health website at www.health.qld.gov.au/coronavirus

The Queensland Health website now includes detailed information by Local Government Area on the number of active and recovered COVID-19 cases, likely source of infection, age and gender breakdowns of confirmed cases and number of self-quarantine notices. You can access this information at www.health.qld.gov.au/covid-data

 


UPDATED May 5, 7.45am

With over five and a half thousand tests been carried out since their last update  (yesterday), and a drop in active cases from 685 to 661, it would appear that New South Wales dwellers are getting something right.

In the Northern Rivers the stats say there have been no changes to the number of COVID-19 cases in NNSWLHD since our last update on Friday.

As at 8pm Sunday 3 May there were 56 cases, with 45 people having recovered so far with no new cases since April 15, that 20 days.

NSW stats stand at:

3033 total confirmed cases including interstate residents in NSW health care facilities

2328 recovered

661 active cases – ** Active cases in our system of case follow up is a calculation based on total cases excluding persons recovered and lives lost, it does not necessarily mean that these cases are infectious

44 lives lost

245,666 people tested and cleared

Table: Confirmed cases

Cases Count
Total confirmed cases 1 3,033
New cases reported since 8pm 2 May 2020 1 1
​Active cases 4 661​
People tested since 8pm 2 May 2020 2 5,571
People tested and excluded since 8pm 2 May 2020 3 5,570
Total people tested 2 248,699
Total people tested and excluded 245,666
Lives lost 3 44
​Recovered 2,328

Table: Confirmed COVID-19 cases in NSW by likely source of infection

Source Cases
Overseas 1,759
Interstate acquired 68
Locally acquired – contact of a confirmed case and/or in a known cluster 846
Locally acquired – contact not identified 360
Under investigation 0
Total 3,033

Note: Case counts reported for a particular day may vary over time due to ongoing investigations and case review.

Graph: Epidemiological curve of confirmed COVID-19 cases in NSW by likely source of infection and onset date


Note: The details on source of infection are subject to change as public health investigations and case interviews are ongoing.

Current COVID-19 clusters in NSW

This list includes locally-acquired clusters only; where a cluster represents 2 or more confirmed COVID-19 cases associated in location and time.

Name of Cluster Date of first positive lab test LGA of event Last case within 14 days Number of cases*
Workplace in Chullora 14/04/2020 City of Canterbury-Bankstown Yes 1-10
Workplace in Lidcombe 11/04/2020 City of Parramatta Yes 1-10
Anglicare Newmarch House 10/04/2020 City of Penrith Yes 41-50
Liverpool Area Cluster 07/04/2020 City of Liverpool and City of Cumberland Yes 1-10
Workplace in Wolli Creek 02/04/2020 City of Bayside Yes 11-20
Waverly Area Cluster 02/04/2020 Waverley Council Yes 1-10
QF28 Santiago – Sydney arriving 29 March 26/03/2020 N/A Yes 31-40
Gosford Hospital 25/03/2020 City of Gosford Yes 11-20
Rose of Sharon Childcare Centre 16/03/2020 City of Blacktown Yes 21-30

*represents the total number cases associated with the cluster diagnosed in NSW as at midday 24 April 2020, presented in ranges of 1-10, 11-20 etc.


Queensland updates

Queensland COVID-19 statistics

Last updated: Midday 4 May 2020

3 New cases (last 24h)

1,038 Total cases

116,650 Total tests

6 Total lives lost

Case summary

Cases Total
Number of confirmed cases 1,038
Last 24 hours 3
Active cases 52
Recovered 980
Current hospitalisations 9
Patients currently in ICU 4
Deaths 6
Data as at 04/05/2020. Refer to data caveats.

Cases overview by Hospital and Health Service and region

Region Total cases Active cases Total recovered Total deaths
Queensland 1,038 52 980 6
HHS
Cairns and Hinterland 33 3 30 0
Central Queensland 8 0 8 0
Central West 0 0 0 0
Childrens Health Queensland 0 0 0 0
Darling Downs 42 0 40 2
Gold Coast 192 9 183 0
Mackay 15 0 15 0
Mater Health Service 0 0 0 0
Metro North 315 18 294 3
Metro South 254 15 239 0
North West 0 0 0 0
South West 0 0 0 0
Sunshine Coast 94 3 90 1
Torres and Cape 0 0 0 0
Townsville 24 2 22 0
West Moreton 37 1 36 0
Wide Bay 24 1 23 0
Interstate/Other 0 0 0 0
Data as at 04/05/2020. Refer to data caveats.

Likely source of infection

Confirmed cases 1,038
Locally Acquired—close contact with confirmed case 174
Locally Acquired—no known contact 44
Interstate acquired 18
Overseas acquired 799
Under investigation 3
Data as at 04/05/2020. Refer to data caveats.

Age and gender of confirmed cases—graph

Queensland success leads sensible steps back to school

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk yesterday announced the first steps allowing Queensland children to return to school.

The Premier said a sensible, gradual return is only possible because of Queensland’s success in slowing the spread of COVID-19.

‘Compare what has happened in this state to what has happened in other parts of the world and Queensland can be very proud,’ the Premier said.

‘It’s only because of these good results we are able to once again lead the progress on the road to recovery.’

The steps to full resumption of school are:

  • May 11: Kindy, Prep, Years 1, 11 and 12 return to school
  • May 15: Assess state-wide response to easing of restrictions
  • May 25: Proposed re-opening to remaining students in remaining grades

‘These are the children who are at the most important junctures of schooling – the beginning and the end of their educational journey,’ the Premier said.

The stages to full school resumption are consistent with Queensland’s measured approach to confronting COVID-19 and balancing family needs with protecting lives during the global pandemic.

Chief Health Officer Dr Jeanette Young said Queensland’s early response to confronting the pandemic was paying dividends now.

‘You only have to look at what we were dealing with prior to the school holidays with what we have now to appreciate why Queensland is in the strong position it is,’ said Dr Young.

Education Minister Grace Grace said the government’s plan has been endorsed by the independent and Catholic school sector as well as principals and teachers alike.

‘Most of all, we have listened to Queensland parents who have done such an incredible job for their children supporting them through home learning,’ said the Minister.

‘I think we all appreciate our teachers and school staff like never before.

‘And their health and safety remains paramount.

‘When students begin to return to school, our schools remain safe and hygienic environments for the teachers and staff who will be in the workplace.’

Social distancing measures to protect adults at schools will include:

  • Staff and students who are unwell must not attend school
  • All adults must maintain social distancing of 1.5 metres
  • Adults must not gather in groups in and around school grounds, car parks, school gates and outside classrooms
  • Parents should use stop, drop and go options rather than walking children into school grounds
  • Strict personal hygiene protocols, including the cleaning of high touch surfaces such as desks and door handles, will remain in place.

The Premier said no-one is forgetting we are still in the midst of a global pandemic.

‘Thankfully Queensland has done better than most and that’s something we can all be proud of,’ she said.


The Queensland Police Service  COVID-19 response statistics

The Queensland Police Service (QPS) is providing ongoing support to Queensland Health as part of a co-ordinated whole of government response to the COVID-19 situation.

Under the provisions of the Public Health Act, police officers can take enforcement action against anyone who is failing to comply with public health directions set out by the Chief Health Officer.

An integral part of the QPS response is to ensure compliance with directions particularly around self-isolation, state borders, non-essential business activity, home confinement, movement and gathering.

Officers can also issue on the spot fines of $1334 for individuals and $6,672 for corporations which fail to abide by the health directions.

QPS COVID-19 response statistics

The following preliminary statistics are current as at: 12.01am Monday, May 4.  

 

 

Last 24hrs  Cumulative total since March 27
Breach of public health directions infringement notices 69 1,740
Compliance checks conducted on individuals in quarantine 124 4,894
Compliance checks conducted on non-essential businesses 71 7196
Vehicles intercepted at state borders 2,278 141,736
Vehicles turned around at state borders 44 1,985
People directed to quarantine at state road borders 72 4,921
Domestic airport passengers arriving into Queensland 177 22,215
Domestic airport passengers directed to quarantine 13 4,368
People refused entry to Qld at domestic airports 0 65

Queensland health stats – May 3

Queensland has one new confirmed case of novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

HHS* Active cases Recovered cases Deaths Total confirmed
cases to date
Cairns and Hinterland 4 29 0 33
Central Queensland 0 8 0 8
Central West 0 0 0 0
Darling Downs 0 40 2 42
Gold Coast 11 181 0 192
Mackay 0 15 0 15
Metro North 16 295 3 314
Metro South 17 236 0 252
North West 0 0 0 0
South West 0 0 0 0
Sunshine Coast 1 91 1 93
Torres and Cape 0 0 0 0
Townsville 2 22 0 24
West Moreton 1 36 0 37
Wide Bay 1 21 0 24
Overseas 0 0 0 0
Total 53 976 6 1035**

 

* HHS level case data may include a patient’s residential address, Public Health Unit managing or location where test was ordered.

** Changes may occur in the number of notifications reported from day to day. This is due to ongoing maintenance and update of notification details as new information becomes available, or where discrepancies are detected through data quality assurance activities.

Currently, 972 of the 1,035 confirmed cases had recently travelled overseas or had close contact with a confirmed case, such as their partner or flatmate.

A total of 115,598 tests for COVID-19 have been undertaken in Queensland, with 1,990 tests undertaken in the previous 24 hours.

Queensland’s testing criteria has been expanded so that anyone in the state who has a fever (or history of fever) or acute respiratory symptoms can get tested.

If you are unwell and you meet the above criteria, you should contact a doctor immediately. Your doctor will decide if you need to be tested for COVID-19.

Before your appointment, please call ahead and tell them about your symptoms so they can prepare for your visit.

Most Queenslanders who have contracted COVID-19 have experienced mild symptoms. Currently, nine of the 53 active confirmed cases are in hospital, with four of these in intensive care. The remainder of active cases are currently recovering at home.

A total of 976 Queenslanders (94% of total cases) have now recovered from COVID-19.

Contact tracing continues for recent cases. Queensland Health will notify the community if any public health alerts are required.

We want everyone to continue playing their part to protect themselves and the more vulnerable in our community. Please continue to follow the recommended advice from us and our federal counterparts in regards to social distancing, public gatherings and general wellbeing.

Critically, make sure you are practising good hygiene and staying home, especially if you’re sick. Washing your hands properly and often is the gold standard of health advice that can help prevent viruses from entering your body.

The most up-to-date reliable information is ava


UPDATED May 4, 8am

Latest NSW COVID-19 stats May 4

3,035 total confirmed cases including interstate residents in NSW health care facilities

2,306 recovered

685 active cases –  Active cases in the system of case follow up is a calculation based on total cases excluding persons recovered and lives lost, it does not necessarily mean that these cases are infectious.

44 lives lost

240,093 people tested and cleared


From the NSW Government

COVID-19 results now available in 60 minutes

High-risk patients will now receive their COVID-19 test results within the hour, down from 24 to 48 hours, as the NSW Government deploys new rapid testing kits statewide.

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kits have been in use in priority regional areas where clusters of concern were identified and will now be rolled out to 29 additional labs.

‘The faster we can isolate higher-risk patients and quarantine their contacts, the less likely they can unknowingly spread it to others,’ said Mr Hazzard.

‘On average, test results are being processed in less than 48 hours from the far corners of this vast state which is an achievement in itself, given the issues with flights and logistics.

‘Now we will have even more vital hours up our sleeve, which will allow us to speed up our contract tracing efforts to map and isolate known contacts of cases.’

NSW has among the highest testing rates in Australia and the world. Mass testing is critical to identifying cases and implementing measures to slow COVID-19.

The new, rapid PCR testing kits are presently in use in NSW Health Pathology laboratories in Broken Hill, Wagga Wagga, Orange, Coffs Harbour and Tamworth and 29 more labs across the state will commence rapid testing from next week.

NSW Health Pathology has thoroughly tested and evaluated the TGA-approved COVID-19 testing kit from the US and has secured a regular supply to meet demand.

Mr Hazzard said the technology used for the rapid COVID-19 testing kit is already in use for the testing of influenza and other respiratory viruses by NSW Health Pathology.

‘These kits are in high demand globally but NSW Health Pathology is working with clinicians to ensure our most high-risk patients reap the benefits,’ said Mr Hazzard.

NSW Health Pathology can perform more than 8000 tests per day within its specialist laboratories, which continues to exceed current demand.


From Scott Morrison

The Prime Minister held a press conference in Canberra yesterday at 6.15pm

‘It’s been another very productive meeting of the National Cabinet today and importantly today, we discussed many issues – both from the economic front as well as on the health front.

‘Success during the COVID-19 pandemic is not just about containing the virus and having low numbers of cases. It is true that we have had some real success on the health front.

‘There are now only around 1,000 active cases around the country today and in many jurisdictions on the numbers, no active cases in those jurisdictions and I note Andrew Barr today has made further announcements on the basis of that.

‘But that’s not the only curve we need to flatten. We need to reduce unemployment, we need to get businesses open, we need to enable Australians to go back to work, to earn, to be able to support their families, their households, and support the Australian economy.

‘These are the curves that we also need to influence. And that’s what success will be measured by together with the outcomes we are seeking on health. We need to restart our economy, we need to restart our society, we can’t keep Australia under the doona, we need to be able to move ahead.’

Read the entire statement here

UPDATED May 4, 7am

Statement on the third meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

The third meeting of the Emergency Committee convened by the WHO Director-General under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) regarding the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), took place on Thursday, 30 April 2020, from 12:00 Geneva time (CEST).

The WHO released this statement this morning

Proceedings of the meeting

Members and advisors of the Emergency Committee were convened by teleconference. Membership of the Emergency Committee was expanded to reflect the nature of the pandemic and the need to include additional areas of expertise.

The Director-General welcomed the Committee, thanked them for their commitment to enhancing global public health, and provided an overview of the major achievements in the COVID-19 response since the last Emergency Committee meeting on 30 January 2020. Representatives of the legal department and the Department of Compliance, Risk Management, and Ethics (CRE) briefed the members on their roles and responsibilities.

The Ethics Officer from CRE provided the members and advisers with an overview of the WHO Declaration of Interest process. The members and advisers were made aware of their individual responsibility to disclose to WHO, in a timely manner, any interests of a personal, professional, financial, intellectual or commercial nature that may give rise to a perceived or direct conflict of interest. They were additionally reminded of their duty to maintain the confidentiality of the meeting discussions and the work of the committee. Only those committee members and advisers who were not considered to have any perceived or direct conflict of interest participated in the meeting.

The Secretariat turned the meeting over to the Chair, Professor Houssin. He also welcomed the Committee and reviewed the objectives and agenda of the meeting.

The WHO Regional Emergency Directors and the Executive Director of the WHO Health Emergencies Programme (WHE) provided regional and the global situation overview. After ensuing discussion, the Committee unanimously agreed that the outbreak still constitutes a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) and offered advice to the Director-General.

The Director-General declared that the outbreak of COVID-19 continues to constitute a PHEIC. He accepted the advice of the Committee to WHO and issued the Committee’s advice to States Parties as Temporary Recommendations under the IHR.

The Emergency Committee will be reconvened within three months or earlier, at the discretion of the Director-General. The Director-General thanked the Committee for its work.

Advice to WHO

Coordination, planning, and monitoring
  • Continue to lead and coordinate the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic in collaboration with countries, the United Nations (UN), and other partners.
  • Work with fragile states and vulnerable countries that require additional technical, logistical and commodity support.
  • Establish mechanisms to compile lessons learned from country and partner experiences and WHO missions and share the best practices and updated recommendations.
  • Provide further guidance to countries about adjusting public health measures, taking into account the different epidemiological situations of the pandemic.
  • Promote the inclusion of all interested countries, including low- and middle-income countries from all regions, in the Solidarity clinical trials for therapeutics and vaccines.
  • Continue efforts with partners to obtain equitable access to personal protective equipment, diagnostics, and biomedical equipment essential to the pandemic COVID-19 response.
  • Continue to coordinate global expert networks in epidemiology, laboratory, vaccines, clinical care, infection prevention and control, social sciences, and operational research; modelling; and other technical support.
One Health
  • Work with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and countries to identify the zoonotic source of the virus and the route of introduction to the human population, including the possible role of intermediate hosts. This should be accomplished through efforts such as scientific and collaborative field missions, which will enable targeted interventions and a research agenda to reduce the risk of similar events.
  • Work closely with OIE and FAO to provide guidance on how to prevent            SARS-CoV-2 infections in animals and humans and prevent the establishment of new zoonotic reservoirs.
  • Work with partner organizations and countries to strengthen the global food supply chain, protect food workers, properly manage food markets, and mitigate possible disruptions to the food supply.
Essential Health Services
  • Support countries to assess and manage the unintended consequences of public health measures implemented to control the COVID-19 pandemic, including gender-based violence and child neglect.
  • Support countries to monitor their ability to provide and strengthen essential health services throughout a likely extended COVID-19 response. This should include, but is not limited to, essential prevention for communicable diseases, particularly vaccination; services related to reproductive health, including care during pregnancy and childbirth; care of vulnerable populations, such as young infants and older adults; provision of medications and supplies for the ongoing management of chronic diseases, including mental health conditions; continuity of critical inpatient therapies; management of emergency health conditions and common acute presentations that require time-sensitive intervention; and auxiliary services, such as basic diagnostic imaging, laboratory services, and blood bank services.
  • Support countries to address shortages of essential medicines and health products, personal protective equipment, and other medical supplies and to establish sustainable risk management practices to prevent future shortages.
Risk communication and community engagement
  • Continue risk communications and community engagement activities through the WHO Information Network for Epidemics (EPI-WIN) and other platforms to counter rumours and misinformation.
  • Continue to regularly communicate clear messages, guidance, and advice about the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic, how to reduce transmission, and save lives.
  • Work with partners and countries to articulate potential long-term consequences of COVID-19 pandemic, emphasizing the need for strengthened cross-sectoral preparedness, transparency and global coordination.
Surveillance
  • Clarify the testing strategy, support countries to increase testing capacity, and aim to provide equitable access to diagnostic tests and supplies in light of market failures and global shortages.
  • Continue to provide guidance on monitoring disease trends using Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) and Influenza Like Illness (ILI) surveillance systems in anticipation of the co-circulation of influenza viruses.
  • Develop qualitative and quantitative indicators that countries can use to assess and monitor SARS-CoV-2 transmission at all levels of public health response.
  • Continue to support countries and partners by providing technical and operational guidance, training platforms, and tools such as Go.Data,to enhance case identification and contact tracing capacity, strengthen the public health workforce, and engage communities for contact tracing.
  • Provide clear qualitative and quantitative indicators to monitor SARS-CoV-2 transmission to inform the adjustment of public health and social measures.
Travel and Trade
  • Continue working with countries and partners to enable essential travel needed for pandemic response, humanitarian relief, repatriation, and cargo operations.
  • Develop strategic guidance with partners for the gradual return to normal operations of passenger travel in a coordinated manner that provides appropriate protection when physical distancing is not feasible.
  • Update recommendations on appropriate travel measures and analyze their effects on international transmission of COVID-19, with consideration of the balance between benefits and unintended consequences, including entry and exit screening, education of travelers on responsible travel behaviour, case finding, contact tracing, isolation, and quarantine, by incorporating evidence on the potential role of pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic transmission.

To all States Parties

Coordination and Collaboration
  • Support WHO leadership and continue to collaborate with WHO at all levels of the organization and with other countries to enable effective global COVID-19 pandemic preparedness and response.
  • Participate in global solidarity efforts to enable access to essential supplies for all.
  • Document and share lessons learned from efforts to control the pandemic, including the timing, pace, and sequencing of the application and lifting of public health measures.
Preparedness
  • Strengthen preparedness for health emergencies, and build resilient health systems, incorporating lessons learned during different stages of the pandemic, and sharing experiences with other countries.
Surveillance
  • Work with WHO and multisectoral partners to interrupt transmission by maintaining robust surveillance systems; enhancing capacities for case detection, testing, isolation of cases, contact tracing, quarantine of contacts, and rapid response; strengthening the public health workforce; and actively engaging communities for contact tracing, with a particular focus on high risk areas.
  • In settings where testing a large proportion of suspected cases is not possible, monitor overall trends; undertake early detection through laboratory confirmation of a limited number of cases with a focus on health workers; and rapidly implement public health measures.
  • Share with WHO all data necessary to conduct global risk assessments through data platforms, such as the Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System and the IHR mechanism. These data should include SARI and ILI where available.
  • Use the WHO qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess and monitor SARS-CoV-2 transmission at all levels of public health response.

Additional Health Measures

  • Avoid restrictions on international transport of food, medical and other essential supplies and permit the safe movement of essential personnel required for an effective pandemic response.
  • Implement appropriate travel measures with consideration of their public health benefits, including entry and exit screening, education of travelers on responsible travel behaviour, case finding, contact tracing, isolation, and quarantine, by incorporating evidence on the potential role of pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic transmission.
  • Implement and monitor case finding and contact tracing of travellers, using digital tools where appropriate.
  • Continue to review travel and trade measures based on regular risk assessments, transmission patterns at origin and destination, cost-benefit analysis, evolution of the pandemic, and new knowledge of COVID-19.
  • Engage in global efforts to respond to the challenges of COVID-19 in managing maritime vessels.
  • Do not implement trade restrictions beyond those considered to be of public health importance in accordance with relevant international agreements.
  • Continue to provide appropriate public health rationale to WHO for additional health measures in accordance with IHR.

Health Workers

  • Prioritize the protection of the health workforce through access to training and provision of personal protective equipment, infection prevention and control measures, improved working conditions, application of WHO recommended testing strategies, and prevention of stigma and attacks on health workers.

Food Security

  • Work with WHO and partners to strengthen the global food supply chain, protect food workers, properly manage food markets, and mitigate possible disruptions to the food supply, especially for vulnerable populations.

One Health

  • Promote sound practices to manage risks of trade of live animals in food markets and regulate trade of exotic wildlife.

Risk Communications and Community Engagement

  • Continue to engage communities to address rumours and misinformation and keep the public informed, with a focus on vulnerable populations.

Research and development

  • Address research gaps such as: routes of transmission, including the role of asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic infection droplet, contact, fomite and aerosol transmission; and viral shedding; and animal source and intermediate hosts, in collaboration with partners.
  • Continue to support and conduct COVID-19 research, in line with the WHO Research and Development Blueprint, and the road map for COVID-19 vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics.
  • Continue sharing full genome sequences to increase global understanding of virus evolution and phylogenetics and their application to public health practices.

Essential Health Services

  • Maintain essential health services throughout a likely extended COVID-19 response. This should include essential prevention for communicable diseases, particularly vaccination; services related to reproductive health, including care during pregnancy and childbirth; care of vulnerable populations, such as young infants and older adults; provision of medications and supplies for the ongoing management of chronic diseases, including mental health conditions; continuity of critical inpatient therapies; management of emergency health conditions and common acute presentations that require time-sensitive intervention; and auxiliary services, such as basic diagnostic imaging, laboratory services, and blood bank services.
  • Continue to track and document the impact of COVID-19 on essential health services.

WHO COVID-19 (coronavirus) world stats updated May 4, 7am AEST

The World Health Organization COVID-19 stats map (cases) updated at 04/05/2020 7am AEST

The World Health Organization COVID-19 stats map (deaths) updated at 04/05/2020 7am AEST

 

 

 

 


UPDATED May 4, 7am

COVID-19 Respiratory Clinics to open in Ballina and Murwillumbah

The North Coast Primary Health Network (NCPHN) is pleased to support the opening of a GP-led respiratory clinics in Ballina and Murwillumbah.

The NCPHN’s CEO Julie Sturgess said the clinics would play a vital role in supporting patients in Ballina and Murwillumbah and surrounding areas throughout the pandemic.

‘Importantly, this respiratory clinic will help the local health care services – taking the pressure off hospitals and general practices by providing dedicated treatment to people with mild-to-moderate symptoms of fever or sore throat, cough, fatigue or shortness of breath,’ said Ms Sturgess.

‘I encourage anyone in our community experiencing these symptoms to call the clinic or go online to book a free appointment.

‘This clinic will help to reduce pressure on local hospitals’ emergency departments and allow other local medical practices to treat people who aren’t showing signs that may relate to coronavirus.

‘It is important to remind people that good hand hygiene, cough and sneeze etiquette, maintaining social distancing and staying at home remain the best defense against COVID-19.’

Murwillumbah Respiratory Clinic director Dr Doug Warne said the clinic was seeing 20 to 30 patients daily. Each appointment takes about 15 minutes.

‘Almost everyone coming in is being swabbed,’ Dr Warne said. ‘Most people have relatively mild symptoms, but they want to be tested to protect themselves and their loved ones.’

Dr Tonya Coren, principal GP of Cape Byron Medical Centre, is leading the clinical team coordinating the Ballina respiratory clinic.

Dr Coren says collaboration between health care professionals and organisations such as Cherry Street Sports and NCPHN is the most effective way to achieve positive outcomes for the community, in response to COVID-19 and beyond.

‘It has been such a pleasure working together to establish the respiratory clinic in Ballina,’ said Dr Coren. ‘Sharing our resources and knowledge, and the concerted effort from everyone involved has been really wonderful.

The NCPHN is one of 31 PHNs located throughout Australia that are working with local hospital districts to advise the Commonwealth Department of Health on the best locations for the clinics right across the country.

People should visit health.gov.au and use the online booking system to make an appointment. The Ballina Respiratory Clinic is open from Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Murwillumbah Respiratory Clinic is open Monday to Friday, 9.15am to 4.45pm..

Appointments must be booked online. When attending, patients should wait in their car and ring the clinic to minimise potential contact with others.

The Australian Government is establishing respiratory clinics at key North Coast locations. The clinics will operate out of existing medical practices. They will complement NSW Health’s existing COVID-19 / fever clinics at Tweed Heads, Byron Bay, Lismore, Grafton, Coffs Harbour, Kempsey and Port Macquarie.

 


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