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Byron Shire
April 15, 2021

Wool industry’s bloody image exposed

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The latest video exposé of abuse in the wool industry released by PETA US reveals shearers on a massive Australian farm a few weeks ago hurling sheep in the air, slamming them to the floor, kicking them, stamping on a sheep’s face and more.

In the aftermath of the release of the exposé, the wool industry is trying to clean up its bloody image by claiming that it’s spending big money on training and research.

But all this ‘training and research’ doesn’t seem to be achieving much: investigations of wool farms have revealed the same systemic abuse at shearing sheds around Australia.

The wool industry should stop treating sheep like punching bags – and fire the workers who engage in such cruelty.

And if it wants to spend money on something that would make a difference for sheep, it should install web cameras in areas where shearing and mulesing take place so that everyone could see how sheep are violently handled and have chunks of their flesh cut from their backsides without painkillers.

That isn’t likely to happen, of course, so I invite readers to visit PETA.org.au to view our wool investigation footage and decide for themselves whether this cruel industry is one they want to support.

Jason Baker, campaign director, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Australia


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