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What is it like to grow up Aboriginal in Australia?

Author Anita Heiss will join Allan Clarke and Delta Kay in conversation at the festival. Photo Amanda James

Award-winning author Anita Heiss’s powerful anthology Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia showcases many diverse voices, experiences and stories of family, country and belonging.

Accounts from well-known authors and high-profile identities including Adam Goodes and Deborah Cheetham sit alongside those from newly discovered writers of all ages. All of the contributors speak from the heart – sometimes calling for empathy, oftentimes challenging stereotypes, always demanding respect.

The Saturday Paper’s review of the book writes, ‘Even readers who consider themselves relatively “woke” will be shocked and shaken by some of these stories and memories. One older writer recalls the sight of a bullet from a new neighbour’s gun passing through his mother’s hair. A younger contributor, meanwhile, writes about dating an English bloke she met on Tinder: when a branch hit the car they were in, making a fud noise, he “joked” that it was probably just a “coon”… There is tragedy and awfulness on these pages, but there is also joy and laughter.’

Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia by Anita Heiss.

Anita Heiss will be at Byron Writers Festival discussing Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia with Allan Clarke, ABC’s Blood on The Tracks investigative journalist, and local Arakwal Bumberbin Bundjalung woman Delta Kay. The session will be chaired by award-winning author Tony Birch, who is also one of the contributors to Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia.

Tickets at www.byronwritersfestival.com.

• See more news and articles on the 2018 Byron Writers Festival.


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