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Byron Shire
April 15, 2024

Oily slick on Belongil is marine blue green algae

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Bangalow retaining wall damage

The wall supporting the western end of Deacon Street has failed – opposite the Roman Catholic Church. Fortunately, this...

Other News

We wonder why

Living in Byron Shire the majority of people continue to ask why is this organisation continuously letting this community...

After school care phased out 

Byron Council will cease providing out of school hours care (OSHC) in the shire after deciding that the cost and regulatory burden is too great to bear.

Friends of the Earth welcome Toondah decision

Friends of the Earth Australia is welcoming the draft decision by Federal Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek to save an important Queensland wetland from inappropriate development.

Mayor’s Wallum negotiations unsupported

An update on closed-door deals around the controversial Wallum development by Mayor Michael Lyon has been criticised as not providing any commitment, trading one endangered species for another, while also ignoring the input from the Save Wallum group.

Itching for a Mullum flea market?

A new flea market will launch this Saturday, April 13 from 8am until 2pm at the Mullum Community College campus.

Israel

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Byron resident David Griffith took this photo of what looked like a toxic spill on Belongil Creek at Childe Street.

A concerned resident sent Echonetdaily a photo of what appeared to be a nasty, toxic sludge he saw on Belongil Creek last Monday. Questions to council found that the oily looking slick on the water’s surface is in fact a naturally occurring marine blue green algae or Trichodesmium.

Staff investigated the slick this week and took samples which were sent off for testing.

Chloe Dowsett, Council’s Biodiversity and Sustainability Coordinator, said while the film on the top of the water looks terrible, it is a natural event and important for the marine environment.

‘Marine blue green algae is naturally occurring and travels down the coast with the east Australian current during the summer months,’ said Ms Dowsett.

‘It sometimes gets trapped in our coastal creeks and because of its appearance people often think it is an oil spill or something toxic,’ she said.

‘This algae is often slimy and smells and can vary in colour from red, brown, green or cream.’

People should avoid swimming and not eat shellfish in areas that are affected by the algae.


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