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Byron Shire
October 2, 2022

David Lovejoy

David Lovejoy arrived in Australia in 1971, after travelling overland (mostly) from England. He helped found The Echo in 1986 and has played many roles in the newspaper’s history. Now officially retired, he still occasionally fills in for sick or holidaying staff in between attending chess tournaments. He has accumulated a son, a daughter, three grandchildren and three cats. In addition to his Echo articles David has written a memoir and two historical novels. See www.pelagius.com.au for more.

Showing content from:David Lovejoy

Gerontocracy rules, okay?

The American president displays the unmistakable signs of old age. He shows a frailty in his movements, and a tendency to forget names.

Editorial – Proselytising the demise of democracy

According to most political commentary last week, the reason for the former prime minister casually screwing up parliamentary democracy is to be found in his overweening, narcissistic nature.

Vindictive and bad faith prosecutions?

As Bernard Collaery’s friends and supporters celebrate the dropping of the prosecution against him, it is still relevant to ask, why were Witness K and his lawyer Collaery put on trial in the first place?

Doctor, my brain hurts

‘Hey you! Take that mask off, it will give you pneumonia, you idiot.’ The speaker, or rather shouter, was red in the face and clearly annoyed with me, though I had no idea who he was. I asked him why he was so angry...

Apple’s, apostrophes and onion’s

The Apostrophe Protection Society, founded in 2001, has announced its end.

Editorial – A potted history of local elections

The election of the Byron Shire mayor and councillors on December 4 will be the ninth such poll this newspaper has covered.

Editorial: A PowerPointless presentation

After all the sound and fury from the Nationals, the Prime Minister announced that his government would move to net zero emissions in 2050 by printing glossy pamphlets and making PowerPoint presentations.

Climate talk vs climate action

The UN Climate Change Conference will open in Glasgow on Sunday, and Scott Morrison will be there, with the grunts, farts and oinks of the National Party ringing in his ears.

Covid Cassandra peers into the future

As the COVID lockdowns draw to a close, there are still people who profess themselves unwilling to vaccinate under any circumstances, and who object to bearing any consequences that may arise.

Editorial: Real men don’t harm others

Standing at a public urinal in Mullumbimby last week, I found myself face-to-face with a small poster stuck to the wall: ‘Real men don’t wear masks’.

Editorial – Local leadership vacuum

The delays in holding Council elections are frustrating, the more so because what we have seen during the long period since the last vote has been an experiment in governing by the zen method of no government.

Do only losers have honour?

There’s a sense in the air that a culture change may be on the way. The need for change has become abundantly clear since the notion of honour disappeared from public life.

Editorial – Fossil fools buy seats at leadership table

Conspiracy theories abound these days. Most of them are feeble balloons that can be popped with one or two sharp facts, but a few contain some truth.

Rabbit holes distract from truth seeking

There I was last week, reading the latest Echo, nodding in agreement with Phillip Frazer, smiling at Mandy’s column, shaking my head over the weird Trump equals Julius Caesar article, when I was suddenly brought to a halt by page 10.

Musings on a decaying Republic, old and new

This is one last head-scratch about Donald Trump and the American political paroxysm before the forty-fifth president drags himself, or is dragged, away.

Mungo puts down his pen

For over 31 years, Mungo MacCallum has written a column of political commentary for this newspaper, for the most part on this page, opposite this space.

Why we should spare that tree

Measures to protect koala habitat have been diluted by the NSW government following a National Party campaign backed mainly by developers fearing the impact of tree preservation on their profits.

The loss of local newspapers and what it means to the North Coast

How dare this American billionaire destroy so many vital community assets in Australia for the sake of saving a fraction of one per cent of his fortune.

After the plague

Not being able to socialise, or go to work, or be abroad for any but officially approved purposes certainly gives a body room to think.

Brain dissection for everyone

As I contemplated my seventy-fifth Christmas through the bottom of a glass, I realised that I still have no idea how my mind works. Or if it is ‘my’ mind. Or even if there is such a thing as ‘mind’

Whatever you do, don’t mention Hitler

It is an observation so universally acknowledged that it has its own name: Godwin’s Law. It refers to the inevitability of Hitler being invoked in the course of any heated political discussion.

Gerontocracy rules, okay?

The American president displays the unmistakable signs of old age. He shows a frailty in his movements, and a tendency to forget names.

Editorial – Proselytising the demise of democracy

According to most political commentary last week, the reason for the former prime minister casually screwing up parliamentary democracy is to be found in his overweening, narcissistic nature.

Vindictive and bad faith prosecutions?

As Bernard Collaery’s friends and supporters celebrate the dropping of the prosecution against him, it is still relevant to ask, why were Witness K and his lawyer Collaery put on trial in the first place?

Doctor, my brain hurts

‘Hey you! Take that mask off, it will give you pneumonia, you idiot.’ The speaker, or rather shouter, was red in the face and clearly annoyed with me, though I had no idea who he was. I asked him why he was so angry...

Apple’s, apostrophes and onion’s

The Apostrophe Protection Society, founded in 2001, has announced its end.

Editorial – A potted history of local elections

The election of the Byron Shire mayor and councillors on December 4 will be the ninth such poll this newspaper has covered.

Editorial: A PowerPointless presentation

After all the sound and fury from the Nationals, the Prime Minister announced that his government would move to net zero emissions in 2050 by printing glossy pamphlets and making PowerPoint presentations.

Climate talk vs climate action

The UN Climate Change Conference will open in Glasgow on Sunday, and Scott Morrison will be there, with the grunts, farts and oinks of the National Party ringing in his ears.

Covid Cassandra peers into the future

As the COVID lockdowns draw to a close, there are still people who profess themselves unwilling to vaccinate under any circumstances, and who object to bearing any consequences that may arise.

Editorial: Real men don’t harm others

Standing at a public urinal in Mullumbimby last week, I found myself face-to-face with a small poster stuck to the wall: ‘Real men don’t wear masks’.

Editorial – Local leadership vacuum

The delays in holding Council elections are frustrating, the more so because what we have seen during the long period since the last vote has been an experiment in governing by the zen method of no government.

Do only losers have honour?

There’s a sense in the air that a culture change may be on the way. The need for change has become abundantly clear since the notion of honour disappeared from public life.

Editorial – Fossil fools buy seats at leadership table

Conspiracy theories abound these days. Most of them are feeble balloons that can be popped with one or two sharp facts, but a few contain some truth.

Rabbit holes distract from truth seeking

There I was last week, reading the latest Echo, nodding in agreement with Phillip Frazer, smiling at Mandy’s column, shaking my head over the weird Trump equals Julius Caesar article, when I was suddenly brought to a halt by page 10.

Musings on a decaying Republic, old and new

This is one last head-scratch about Donald Trump and the American political paroxysm before the forty-fifth president drags himself, or is dragged, away.

Mungo puts down his pen

For over 31 years, Mungo MacCallum has written a column of political commentary for this newspaper, for the most part on this page, opposite this space.

Why we should spare that tree

Measures to protect koala habitat have been diluted by the NSW government following a National Party campaign backed mainly by developers fearing the impact of tree preservation on their profits.

The loss of local newspapers and what it means to the North Coast

How dare this American billionaire destroy so many vital community assets in Australia for the sake of saving a fraction of one per cent of his fortune.

After the plague

Not being able to socialise, or go to work, or be abroad for any but officially approved purposes certainly gives a body room to think.

Brain dissection for everyone

As I contemplated my seventy-fifth Christmas through the bottom of a glass, I realised that I still have no idea how my mind works. Or if it is ‘my’ mind. Or even if there is such a thing as ‘mind’

Whatever you do, don’t mention Hitler

It is an observation so universally acknowledged that it has its own name: Godwin’s Law. It refers to the inevitability of Hitler being invoked in the course of any heated political discussion.
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