22 C
Byron Shire
September 23, 2021

David Lovejoy

David Lovejoy arrived in Australia in 1971, after travelling overland (mostly) from England. He helped found The Echo in 1986 and has played many roles in the newspaper’s history. Now officially retired, he still occasionally fills in for sick or holidaying staff in between attending chess tournaments. He has accumulated a son, a daughter, three grandchildren and three cats. In addition to his Echo articles David has written a memoir and two historical novels. See www.pelagius.com.au for more.

Showing content from:David Lovejoy

Editorial: Real men don’t harm others

Standing at a public urinal in Mullumbimby last week, I found myself face-to-face with a small poster stuck to the wall: ‘Real men don’t wear masks’.

Editorial – Local leadership vacuum

The delays in holding Council elections are frustrating, the more so because what we have seen during the long period since the last vote has been an experiment in governing by the zen method of no government.

Do only losers have honour?

There’s a sense in the air that a culture change may be on the way. The need for change has become abundantly clear since the notion of honour disappeared from public life.

Editorial – Fossil fools buy seats at leadership table

Conspiracy theories abound these days. Most of them are feeble balloons that can be popped with one or two sharp facts, but a few contain some truth.

Rabbit holes distract from truth seeking

There I was last week, reading the latest Echo, nodding in agreement with Phillip Frazer, smiling at Mandy’s column, shaking my head over the weird Trump equals Julius Caesar article, when I was suddenly brought to a halt by page 10.

Musings on a decaying Republic, old and new

This is one last head-scratch about Donald Trump and the American political paroxysm before the forty-fifth president drags himself, or is dragged, away.

Mungo puts down his pen

For over 31 years, Mungo MacCallum has written a column of political commentary for this newspaper, for the most part on this page, opposite this space.

Why we should spare that tree

Measures to protect koala habitat have been diluted by the NSW government following a National Party campaign backed mainly by developers fearing the impact of tree preservation on their profits.

The loss of local newspapers and what it means to the North Coast

How dare this American billionaire destroy so many vital community assets in Australia for the sake of saving a fraction of one per cent of his fortune.

After the plague

Not being able to socialise, or go to work, or be abroad for any but officially approved purposes certainly gives a body room to think.

Brain dissection for everyone

As I contemplated my seventy-fifth Christmas through the bottom of a glass, I realised that I still have no idea how my mind works. Or if it is ‘my’ mind. Or even if there is such a thing as ‘mind’

Whatever you do, don’t mention Hitler

It is an observation so universally acknowledged that it has its own name: Godwin’s Law. It refers to the inevitability of Hitler being invoked in the course of any heated political discussion.

All aboard the Extinction Express

Something has changed in the climate crisis argument…

Editorial: The dice are loaded

The Regional Planning Panel (RPP) booked the Byron Theatre last week in order to give local people the opportunity to let off steam with verbal objections to the West Byron development proposal.

Three-way tussle for hospital

Lyn Dickinson, Pottsville According to the NSW Government North Coast Regional Plan, it was always intended that the Tweed Heads hospital be refurbished, retained and...

The end of fun: David Lovejoy concludes the story of the The Echo’s early years

While the drama of general manager Max Eastcott’s departure was playing out, The Echo passed its tenth birthday, and we marked the jubilee with a fourth awards night.

How do you dismiss a general manager?

Founding editor Nicholas Shand returned from his long-service leave at the end of March, 1996. He was highly amused at the comic opera scenario playing out in Council, and at The Echo’s unavoidable central role in it.

The danger of delegated authority as The Echo gambles its reputation on a town planner

When in February 1996 Fast Buck$ obtained a file that described a developer in Byron Bay obtaining preferential treatment from Council, he published an advertisement in The Echo headed, ‘Something stinks at Hog’s Breath’.

Changing Council and premises

By the election of September 1995 most people had had enough of Cr Ross Tucker and his crew. Although at that stage the evidence of the colossal mismanagement of Council’s planning and finances had yet to emerge

Ross and Max to the fore: Dirty tactics key to undermining the opposition

As the Club Med battle described in the previous episode approached its climax, the leader of Council’s conservatives, Ross Tucker, decided on a diversion.

Club Med and the Gang of Six

By the beginning of 1993 The Echo had outgrown its A4 page size, and our first large-format edition appeared in March that year. The increased work combined with the ritual of putting the paper to bed on Monday nights became quite stressful.

Editorial: Real men don’t harm others

Standing at a public urinal in Mullumbimby last week, I found myself face-to-face with a small poster stuck to the wall: ‘Real men don’t wear masks’.

Editorial – Local leadership vacuum

The delays in holding Council elections are frustrating, the more so because what we have seen during the long period since the last vote has been an experiment in governing by the zen method of no government.

Do only losers have honour?

There’s a sense in the air that a culture change may be on the way. The need for change has become abundantly clear since the notion of honour disappeared from public life.

Editorial – Fossil fools buy seats at leadership table

Conspiracy theories abound these days. Most of them are feeble balloons that can be popped with one or two sharp facts, but a few contain some truth.

Rabbit holes distract from truth seeking

There I was last week, reading the latest Echo, nodding in agreement with Phillip Frazer, smiling at Mandy’s column, shaking my head over the weird Trump equals Julius Caesar article, when I was suddenly brought to a halt by page 10.

Musings on a decaying Republic, old and new

This is one last head-scratch about Donald Trump and the American political paroxysm before the forty-fifth president drags himself, or is dragged, away.

Mungo puts down his pen

For over 31 years, Mungo MacCallum has written a column of political commentary for this newspaper, for the most part on this page, opposite this space.

Why we should spare that tree

Measures to protect koala habitat have been diluted by the NSW government following a National Party campaign backed mainly by developers fearing the impact of tree preservation on their profits.

The loss of local newspapers and what it means to the North Coast

How dare this American billionaire destroy so many vital community assets in Australia for the sake of saving a fraction of one per cent of his fortune.

After the plague

Not being able to socialise, or go to work, or be abroad for any but officially approved purposes certainly gives a body room to think.

Brain dissection for everyone

As I contemplated my seventy-fifth Christmas through the bottom of a glass, I realised that I still have no idea how my mind works. Or if it is ‘my’ mind. Or even if there is such a thing as ‘mind’

Whatever you do, don’t mention Hitler

It is an observation so universally acknowledged that it has its own name: Godwin’s Law. It refers to the inevitability of Hitler being invoked in the course of any heated political discussion.

All aboard the Extinction Express

Something has changed in the climate crisis argument…

Editorial: The dice are loaded

The Regional Planning Panel (RPP) booked the Byron Theatre last week in order to give local people the opportunity to let off steam with verbal objections to the West Byron development proposal.

Three-way tussle for hospital

Lyn Dickinson, Pottsville According to the NSW Government North Coast Regional Plan, it was always intended that the Tweed Heads hospital be refurbished, retained and...

The end of fun: David Lovejoy concludes the story of the The Echo’s early years

While the drama of general manager Max Eastcott’s departure was playing out, The Echo passed its tenth birthday, and we marked the jubilee with a fourth awards night.

How do you dismiss a general manager?

Founding editor Nicholas Shand returned from his long-service leave at the end of March, 1996. He was highly amused at the comic opera scenario playing out in Council, and at The Echo’s unavoidable central role in it.

The danger of delegated authority as The Echo gambles its reputation on a town planner

When in February 1996 Fast Buck$ obtained a file that described a developer in Byron Bay obtaining preferential treatment from Council, he published an advertisement in The Echo headed, ‘Something stinks at Hog’s Breath’.

Changing Council and premises

By the election of September 1995 most people had had enough of Cr Ross Tucker and his crew. Although at that stage the evidence of the colossal mismanagement of Council’s planning and finances had yet to emerge

Ross and Max to the fore: Dirty tactics key to undermining the opposition

As the Club Med battle described in the previous episode approached its climax, the leader of Council’s conservatives, Ross Tucker, decided on a diversion.

Club Med and the Gang of Six

By the beginning of 1993 The Echo had outgrown its A4 page size, and our first large-format edition appeared in March that year. The increased work combined with the ritual of putting the paper to bed on Monday nights became quite stressful.
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