17 C
Byron Shire
May 8, 2021

Music touches the soul at every age

Latest News

Join Clarkes Beach paddle out this weekend to stop massive oil and gas field project

Hundreds of local surfers and water-lovers will paddle out at Clarke’s Beach over the weekend to protest against a massive oil and gas field proposed for the NSW coast.

Other News

Ballina Dragons’ great results at Urunga

The Ballina Dragon Boat Racing Club is a group of paddling people from all walks of life who enjoy being out on the water having fun and keeping fit.

Man dead after boat capsizes near Yamba

Police say a man has died and a second has been taken to hospital after a boat capsized south of Yamba this morning.

From go to whoa – Norco Primex expo covers it all

Norco and Primex are bringing a three-day sustainable farming and primary industry expo to you.

Boarding houses

Matthew O’Reilly, CABS president and Council candidate for the new Byron Greens The over-development of cramped boarding-house accommodation in Sunrise...

Come and try basketball in Byron

The next generation of female basketball players, with coordinator Karen Irwin, turned up to a ‘come and try day’...

Jonson Street bus shelter gone and an era ended

Byron Shire Council says that the wooden bus shelter on Jonson Street outside the Byron Visitors Centre is being removed today with all bus services operating from the new bus interchange on Butler Street in Byron Bay

 

‘Silent discos’ may be all the rage with Gen Y, but a new group of groovers is taking to the headphones in a groundbreaking program that is awakening long lost memories.

Feros Care has established silent discos – a form of music therapy – across its Byron Bay, Bangalow and Wommin Bay villages and it has had incredible results, particularly for those with dementia.

Residents were given a headset, which played popular music from their past, helping to tap into areas of their brain that other therapies could not.

Feros Care positive living coordinator Jennie Hewitt said ‘We have residents who have not spoken a full sentence in years, but when the music comes on, they start to sing the words and it brings up memories for them they otherwise can not seem to access.’

Music is increasingly being used in memory research, especially in the aged care sector. Research suggests the link between music and memory is particularly strong because it has the ability to activate large areas of the brain, including the auditory, motor and emotional regions.

The motor areas process the rhythm, the auditory areas the sound, while the limbic regions are associated with the emotions.

‘With the change in behaviour and sudden enjoyment we see once the music starts, there is definitely something going on there,’ said Ms Hewitt.

‘It does not take much for the residents to be up on their feet and dancing like they did when they were younger. Even those who can no longer walk sometimes stand-up out of their wheelchairs and get into the movement – it is just amazing.’

It’s time to groove at Feros Care for Pat-Oleson, 77 and Nina Marzi 96.Photo supplied.

Ms Hewitt said, interestingly, the therapy did not end when the music stopped.

‘The greatest impact we have seen is on the people who are not able to communicate ordinarily, said Ms Hewitt.

‘There were two residents who, after the therapy, were able to talk for the rest of the day.

‘We do also find their general mood is elevated for around two days after the sessions.

“During this time, we have been thrilled to see family come in and have the

opportunity to talk to their parent for the first time in ages, after the  music therapy.’

Ms Hewitt said the ‘silent disco’ form of therapy was very different to playing music in an open space.

‘There are no distractions for them – all they hear is their music and the voice of the facilitator, they become quite personally invested in it,’ she said.

‘What is also amazing is even though they can not hear or speak to each other, they end up doing things in unison, so you get this group atmosphere and the whole room is dancing.’

Ms Hewitt said the ‘silent disco’ sessions were just one part of the ‘grow bold’ culture at Feros Care.

‘What we are trying to do is find all sorts of avenues for residents to experience something new during this chapter in their lives,’ she said.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Man dead after boat capsizes near Yamba

Police say a man has died and a second has been taken to hospital after a boat capsized south of Yamba this morning.

Jonson Street bus shelter gone and an era ended

Byron Shire Council says that the wooden bus shelter on Jonson Street outside the Byron Visitors Centre is being removed today with all bus services operating from the new bus interchange on Butler Street in Byron Bay

Upside down river

Tim Harrington, Lennox Head Letter contributor Richard White (letters 21/4/21) quite correctly identifies the Richmond River as an ‘upside down river’ and nowhere is this more...

Ballina Dragons’ great results at Urunga

The Ballina Dragon Boat Racing Club is a group of paddling people from all walks of life who enjoy being out on the water having fun and keeping fit.