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Byron Shire
September 18, 2021
Home Articles & Columns Tangle of Life

Tangle of Life

Time to change or expect a seven metre sea rise

Each of us is an individual world maintained within a larger collective world. So are all the other living things.

There is no life without water: time to save

Yes, the recent rain is wonderful, but acting on water use restrictions must become our usual way of life, at least until the drought is over.

Creating spaces for nature

With the closing of the Byron sewage treatment plant, people minimised their industrial presence. In these conditions, nature’s healing processes took over.

Another take on ticks: ’tis the season

Without my friend noticing, a creature smaller than a little fingernail was perched on a stem of grass and leapt to the safety of his sock.

What to do NOW after climate change march?

Children, teens and all their supporters, what do you do after the excitement of the recent climate change marches? There’s no quick fix.

The small fry in a world of baleen giants

Like others that day at the Cape Byron lighthouse, David Bryant saw this small whale ride a wave. Skilled photographer that he is, he had his camera to the ready and took this photo that has flashed its way through media around the world.

Protocols, process, and system failures

In the lagoon, the pace of winter life during the long dry seems pretty settled. The growth of small estuarine prawns slows down. Bream now five years old are grown up, itching for saltwater and their winter spawn.

Will the ‘Ozzie otter’ vanish along with the other 1,000,000 threatened species?

The Australian otter is not otter an at all and while there were once plenty, loss of habitat through development and roads means their numbers are falling.

A vision for the future of Byron’s wetlands

Could the future of West Byron lands lead the regeneration of seafood supply in the Belongil catchment and the sub-tropic region from the Richmond to the Brunswick?

Are there more sharks in our waters?

Are there more sharks or have we just become accustomed to vanishing species in our midst?

Long lost relative or ‘exotic’ plant?

The Heliconia started their spectacular annual display of red and gold in late November. What is so compelling about them?

Coastal squeeze and preparing for a future of climate change

Development in floodplains and on shores means walls, roads, residences, and every kind of construction are built. As the sea levels rise, the low-water mark marches landward to meet these barriers. The space between is shrinking or disappearing.

Should we feel free to pee in the sea?

As the holiday season gets underway, this toilet block, as does every other near the beach, becomes one of the busiest places in Byron Shire.

Bird’s eye view of our parklands

Although many municipal plans aim to cool off hot towns, improve waterways and protect human health, they can also support wildlife. Plans in Byron Shire can become exercises in empathy.

Trees or biotechnological genetic rescue?

We peered through the branches amazed to see this colourful bird, resting one wing awkwardly. By the next day it would be dead.

Death of a platypus leaves unanswered questions

We found it dead on the sand near the mouth of the Tallow’ the woman said. The corpse stunk a little but I hardly noticed. I was so astonished. What was this platypus doing here? Who knew there were any around this side of Byron Bay? How did it live? As importantly, how did it die?

The trouble with lichen

What lichens truly are is still startling. One apparently global species turns out to be made of one species of fungi with a different species of algae depending which hemisphere it finds itself.

Will species synchronicity lead to ecological collapse?

Parrots are often called the primates of the bird world. They are intelligent, playful and determined, grasping and changing their world using their feet and beaks like hands holding scissors.

Batting for bats: their vital role in forestry

Flying foxes live life large across the landscape. They are the chief pollinators and seed carriers for many species of forest trees.

Join the BioBlitz and discover aquatic mysteries

On the 12th of May take a few minutes and help track down the elusive mysterious highly prized wild shellfish reefs and beds somewhere near you.

COVID update – sewage detection in East and South Lismore and Byron Bay

Northern NSW Local Health District is urging people in the Lismore City and Byron Bay areas to get tested for COVID-19, after fragments of the virus were detected in samples from the East Lismore, South Lismore and Byron Bay sewage treatment plants.

The old slouch hat

‘This is my favourite,’ we say espite the painfully obvious fact that we all, from time to time enjoy a wide variety of hats. Jon Summers, Suffolk Park

The year 2000

I must answer David Heilpern. Remember 2000, how the computers were all to fail on NYE? How could so many get it so wrong? Why...

Viruses

Viruses are organisms at the edge of life and possess genes, evolve by natural selection, and reproduce by creating multiple copies of themselves through...